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Author Topic: Multiple parallel secondaries for higher current  (Read 700 times)
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Probably a simple question, but I can't wrap my head around it. Lets say I have a transformer with 2 identical secondary windings wound in the same direction. Can I connect them in parallel to double the current they can handle? Is this essentially the same as using one winding of double the thickness? It just doesn't seem right because the wires are insulated from each other except for at the ends, but google suggests that it's possible.
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1) Is it a single phase transformer?
2) DO you have 4 wires coming out of the transformer?
3) What colour are your wires?

In theory yes, you can, but you need to be very careful about what you are doing.

If you have 4 wires then colour coding may give you a clue.

What you need to do is find the correct polarity for those two windings as you want to connect them in phase and not out of phase. Connecting out of phase will be like applying two power supplies shorted together and you DO NOT want to do that.

I would advise you DO NOT continue unless you are a qualified electrician AND totally understand the safety precautions, hazards and risks associated.

If I was going to do this then I would look for wiring to indicate polarity of the windings.

I would then join two wires of the secondary together.

I would ONLY connect TWO wires, to leave me three ends, which I would ensure are all separated and safe for energising.

I WOULD NOT connect the other two wires yet.

I would then power up the primary and test the ouput of the secondary. I would be looking for stated voltage between each single wire and the connected two. Across the outer single wires I would be expecting to get double the voltage or zero, with zero being what I want.

IF I had double voltage then the secondaries are in series and I'd de-energise and alter my commoned connection.

IF I had zero between the OUTER wires then I'd go ahead and connect the remaining two wires to put the secondaries in Parallel as required.

*** AGAIN, I ADVISE YOU NOT ATTEMPTING THIS UNLESS YOU ARE QUALIFIED AND COMPLETELY COMPETENT TO DO SO ***
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I probably should have mentioned that I'll be winding the secondary myself, so there will be no confusion as to which side of the winding is where. I just wanted to check if this was even possible, as it's much easier to wind several thin coils than it is to wind one very thick coil.
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Lets say I have a transformer with 2 identical secondary windings wound in the same direction. Can I connect them in parallel to double the current they can handle? Is this essentially the same as using one winding of double the thickness?

Yes and No, at AC step down transformer is Yes, at RF transformer is No, at RF transformer 2 identical secondary windings could out perform up to 30% than 1 secondary winding. u need make sure 2 windings identical ( i.e. same turns/output voltage , same direction/phase, but same thickness is not required, most commonly it is)
« Last Edit: March 20, 2013, 11:31:52 am by sonnyyu » Logged

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I probably should have mentioned that I'll be winding the secondary myself, so there will be no confusion as to which side of the winding is where. I just wanted to check if this was even possible, as it's much easier to wind several thin coils than it is to wind one very thick coil.

reason 1.

It's much easier to wind several thin coils than it is to wind one very thick coil.

reason 2.

RF transformer, out perform.

reason 3.

Cost effective, same tech use primarily winding. to make universe transformer 220v/110v.
serial for 220 V, and parallel for 110 V, at 110 V double current and output will be same as 220V.





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