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Topic: Difference between "Serial Programmer" and "ISP serial programmer" (Read 576 times) previous topic - next topic

stroccia


Hi all,
I'm a newbie in Atmel world, so I'm still trying to understand...
Imagine I have a PC with Linux and a serial port. As I understood, I can program an Atmel AVR (without bootloader) through the serial port but I find in internet two kind of programmers:
1) Serial programmers: very simple and cheap (few components);
2) ISP(In System Programmer) serial programmers: built using micro-controllers (Atmel) loaded with certain software.

Could someone explain to me the difference , and what kind of software is loaded in ISP serial programmers?

Thanks.
Stroccia

fungus


I'm a newbie in Atmel world, so I'm still trying to understand...
Imagine I have a PC with Linux and a serial port. As I understood, I can program an Atmel AVR (without bootloader) through the serial port


No, the chip needs a bootloader.

This is the function of a bootloader - to allow you to program the chip with just a serial port.
No, I don't answer questions sent in private messages (but I do accept thank-you notes...)

westfw

A "serial programmer" is a device programmer that connects to your PC using the serial port.
an "In-circuit Serial Programmer" (ISP) is a device programmer that connects to the AVR via the ISP pins.
A programmer can be both - connecting to the PC via a serial port and connecting to the AVR via ISP (and this is pretty common, especially if you include USB/Serial converters as "PC Serial Ports"), or it can be neither, like a high-voltage parallel programmer that connects to the PC via USB and to the AVR in parallel programming mode.

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