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Topic: Help incorporating Arduino in the classroom (Read 302 times) previous topic - next topic

jwint01

I'm a high school physics teacher who has been tasked with teaching a senior electronics course. Previously we have covered basic bread boarding and soldering. A colleague suggested that I look into incorporating Arduino into my course. I have some basic electronics and programming experience, but I have never worked with Arduino before. I have been looking into it and I am overwhelmed by all the information. Here are the big questions I have:

1. What type of Arduino board would be best to order for my students?

2. What equipment do I need besides the Arduino in order to implement it in my classroom?

3. What are some good educational resources I can check out in order to bolster my knowledge of Arduino before I cover it with my students?

Thanks!

JimboZA

Have a look at forum member Crossroads' (along with Mrs CR) text book, Arduino for Teens.



Johannesburg hams call me: ZS6JMB on Highveld rep 145.7875 (-600 & 88.5 tone)
Dr Perry Cox: "Help me to help you, help me to help you...."
Your answer may already be here: https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=384198.0

terryking228

Hi,

Take a look at the how to on http://ArduinoInfo.Info

Example:  http://arduino-info.wikispaces.com/YourDuinoEngStarter

This information and kits have been used by over 1000 students...

Feel free to email mailto:terry@yourduino.com Terry King to discuss this..


DISCLAIMER: Mentioned stuff from my own shop...
Regards, Terry King terry@yourduino.com  - Check great prices, devices and Arduino-related boards at http://YourDuino.com
HOW-TO: http://ArduinoInfo.Info

jwint01

Thanks for the help. So what is the difference between the Arduino UNO controlled and the RoboRed controller? I read all your specs online, but being a complete newbie, I'm not sure what it all means.

JimboZA

So what is the difference between the Arduino UNO controlled and the RoboRed controller?
First those yellow/red/blue lines of connectors make it easier to hook up anything with 3 wires like a temperature sensor say: it's easy to run out of 5V and Gnd pins on a standard Uno then you need to resort to breadboard, so this is easier.

Second it says it can provide 2000mA straight from the board; standard Uno is only 500 (IIRC, don't quote me) which means you need an external supply even for one servo.

Johannesburg hams call me: ZS6JMB on Highveld rep 145.7875 (-600 & 88.5 tone)
Dr Perry Cox: "Help me to help you, help me to help you...."
Your answer may already be here: https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=384198.0

terryking228

Thanks Jimbo, for the good explanation.

Overall RoboRED info  HERE:
and comparision with UNO and Sparkfun Redboard  HERE:

We supply the RoboRED to hundreds of students in our kits like  THIS: and  THIS:

See an example of the Tutorial information  HERE:

I'd be happy to answer any questions!

DISCLAIMER: Mentioned stuff from my own shop...
Regards, Terry King terry@yourduino.com  - Check great prices, devices and Arduino-related boards at http://YourDuino.com
HOW-TO: http://ArduinoInfo.Info

econjack

I use Terry's Robo Red for prototyping new circuits all the time because: 1) easy access to all the pins via the pin headers he has on the board, 2) the board accepts Arduino Uno shields. Also, his online tutorials are very good, and he knows his stuff and has the ability to impart that while writing. I managed to talk Terry into serving as the Technical Editor on the 2nd Edition of my Beginning C for Arduino book and his EE knowledge proved invaluable.

He also has some nice "bundled" packages that would likely be perfect for your needs.

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