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Topic: Making more arduino projects without buying new arduino boards? (Read 3533 times) previous topic - next topic

CrossRoads

Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

dc42


stripboard ... foul stuff ...


Why? I use it for prototypes and 1-off designs, although it doesn't permit the component density of a PCB. For hybrid analog/digital designs, I sometimes supplement the stripboard with VeroWire for the digital signals to get higher density.
Formal verification of safety-critical software, software development, and electronic design and prototyping. See http://www.eschertech.com. Please do not ask for unpaid help via PM, use the forum.

CrossRoads

I tried it to make a breakout board for fiftysix 7 segment displays. Each connector needed a unique common cathode, all the anode would have been connected on patrallel
The amount of cutting to seperate for the 1 signal in each signal was such a pain in the ass, I quit on it after putting in a couple of headers and the current limit resistors.
Wirewrapped it up instead on a "island of  hole" board and finished the incoming signals and 56 connectors worth of breakout in just a few hours.
I will not use point to point soldering for anything anymore.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

dc42


I tried it to make a breakout board for fiftysix 7 segment displays. Each connector needed a unique common cathode, all the anode would have been connected on patrallel
The amount of cutting to seperate for the 1 signal in each signal was such a pain in the ass, I quit on it after putting in a couple of headers and the current limit resistors.
Wirewrapped it up instead on a "island of  hole" board and finished the incoming signals and 56 connectors worth of breakout in just a few hours.
I will not use point to point soldering for anything anymore.


Stripboard is good when you have a lot of discrete components, but Verowire is better when you are mostly just connecting ICs or displays etc. together as in the system you describe. It's quick and easy, and you end up with a nice shallow board that can be put in an enclosure.
Formal verification of safety-critical software, software development, and electronic design and prototyping. See http://www.eschertech.com. Please do not ask for unpaid help via PM, use the forum.

CrossRoads

Wirewrap, I'll stick with that. I have the tools, I have rolls of wire, and sockets and headers are inexpensive. No soldering required at all after the wiring is done - and better, no Unsoldering if any changes are needed.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

BillO


The amount of cutting to seperate for the 1 signal in each signal was such a pain in the ass


If you use a small drill bit in a pin vise, you can cut traces in under 2 seconds per trace without any real effort.  just 3 or 4 twiddles of the pin vice betwixt thumb and forefinger.  I use a dual ended pin vice with a cutting bit on one end and on the other end I have a small bit to drill out the holes for slightly larger pins.  This form of prototyping is not so bad, really.  Just a matter of technique.

I too like WW, but it became almost impossible to find supplies a while back so I drifted away from it.  Now there are some places catering to WW fans, but it does tend to be a bit pricey.  It also requires good technique to produce reliable results and no less so that using strip board.  The one real drawback to WW though, is the height of the boards caused by the WW pins.
Facts just don't care if you ignore them.

AlxDroidDev

#21
Apr 16, 2013, 07:29 pm Last Edit: Apr 16, 2013, 07:37 pm by AlxDroidDev Reason: 1

That's the thing. I feel that no matter what we do we're still looking at over $20. The breadboard is around $10 alone, and ATmega328 is $5. A couple of dollars for the 16MHz crystal, wires, shipping, etc.


You can make your own board at home, for very little money. If you already have a blank PCB and ferric chloride, we are talking about ZERO investment. Both of the previous items are very cheap.

The only real expensive part is the Atmega328P-PU chip, but you can buy them for $2.95 from Amazon.com. There is one seller (Baligna) there selling the non-P version of the 328-PU for $1 each.

I have 5 Arduino boards I built at home. None of them have built-in USB port, but I expose both the serial port header for a FTDI USB adapter and the ICSP header (for using with ArduinoISP, USBasp or avrisp).

Below are 2 examples of Arduino clones I built at home. The first is a specialized arduino board, with a buzzer, header for bluetooth, FTDI Basic header plus a few other connectors I need. I don't need to make all the arduino pins available in this board.

The other is a general purpose Arduino, also dependant on an external FTDI adapter.

Both feature an Atmega328-PU (of the non-P type), but flashed with the regular UNO bootloader. I used an Arduino as ISP  and breadboard to flash the bootloader on these 2 chips.








Learn to live: Live to learn.
Showing off my work: http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/topic,126197.0.html

retrolefty

For embedding into a project it's hard to beat the cost of the clone NANO boards on E-bay. These include a FTDI and USB connector and built in voltage regulator if you want to use external DC power. Does anyone think they could duplicate this board for less costs?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Iduino-NANO328-Atmega328-V3-5V-16Mhz-compatible-with-Arduino-s-IDE-/281041059063?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item416f5a3cf7

Lefty

DirtBiker

Does anyone think they could duplicate this board for less costs?


While the price on those is truly awesome, they may not fit everyone's needs the way they sit.  There is a lot to be said for the custom approach for meeting a person's needs and it may be worth a penny or two.

This board below uses a shield PCB as the main PCB, it works well either way.  This one is going to be a custom board and there are additional parts to add.  But as you see it there, my cost is less than $9.00.  These are the main parts from my favorite store:
http://www.aztecmcu.com/catalog/i139.html
http://www.aztecmcu.com/catalog/i125.html


I've also built up a few of these with female headers for friends getting into Ardunio (actually, I got them to build them.  All part of the fun).  With a regulator and female headers they work out to about $12.00 and are basically a full featured Arduino that can accept shields and all.
Dirt Biker

BillO


how about this:
https://www.virtuabotix.com/?page_id=3117&productid=0609224531743
a breadboard arduino with 5v regulator for $9 plus $2 shipping.


How about this one:

http://www.aztecmcu.com/catalog/i136.html

A buck more and you get the breadboard, the wires and the right sized capacitors to boot.  No regulator though, but they are only $0.50.
Facts just don't care if you ignore them.

CrossRoads

There are lots of small arduino choices. This is one the first that caught my eye 2+ years ago.
https://solarbotics.com/product/kardw/
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

CrossRoads

I never actually got any tho. I used promini's for a while to start, then made my own as needed, some examples:
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

GoForSmoke

See this?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yMzRi4AAvV4

Spend some extra on a socket and header pins to lengthen the socket pins then build onto those, then plug your AVR in.

I'm all for using extra sockets to plug things into as cheap breadboards. The body keeps the parts together. 

If there's a whole lot of parts and connections then sure, make boards is better by far. But automatically "there must be a board" is like
for ( long i = 0; i < 3; i++ ) { ...... };

Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

sencorp

I picked up 7 pro mini's from ebay for about 15 bucks with free shipping. I have been using them for my projects, and just using my UNO board to program the mini's.  Doing a breadboard config with a chip, crystal, and basic components would be the best way I think, but if you are really new to electronics, go with buying some mini's and using them for your projects. Later on down the road you can get into PCB design and how to home brew your own circuit boards for really cheap as well.  (FYI) Just be warned. If you do hop up on ebay and order from china, be sure to contact the seller first with a question asking if they have them in stock and ready to ship, otherwise you might end up waiting 2 months to get your stuff.  I know a guy in china I get all my stuff from, and he is a SUPER FAST shipper. If you are interested pm me and I will shoot you over his ebay store.

Good luck.


CrossRoads

Oh, I am waaay past that!
http://www.crossroadsfencing.com/BobuinoRev17/
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

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