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Topic: Homemade Atmega328P-AU programmer (Read 3394 times) previous topic - next topic

Jack Christensen



Clever.  I'll have to modify (after searching) the six-pin ISP header.  Thanks.


Yeah, they have that one in there too. I've been using them, they work well for me.
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

Coding Badly


Have you tried it with DIP sockets?

Jack Christensen



Have you tried it with DIP sockets?


That I have not. Might not work as well, as the pins are usually not square or as rigid. But it might work well enough.
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

Docedison

I saw that for the first time on Jeenodes.. DIY PCB's, staggered pins and I thought it for a special connector till I fitted a 6 pin female to the holes and it didn't fall out..

Doc
--> WA7EMS <--
"The solution of every problem is another problem." -Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
I do answer technical questions PM'd to me with whatever is in my clipboard

xl97

#19
Apr 18, 2013, 06:04 pm Last Edit: Apr 18, 2013, 06:13 pm by xl97 Reason: 1
nice post.. (working through a similar dilemma myself)

this: http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__27195__Atmel_Atmega_Socket_Firmware_Flashing_Tool.html

is sweet!  (too bad its $20.00!! though)   :(

but would sure fix the problem with boards that use the ATmega328P-AU chips and FORGET TO PUT THE ICSP headers in there!  :)

your project sorta reminds me of this:

1 Inch Square of Goodness board-

http://thecustomgeek.com/2012/07/09/one-square-inch-of-goodness/
http://thecustomgeek.com/store/products/one-square-inch-of-goodness/

it comes as a 'kit' without the ATmega328P-AU chip soldered on.. so you can put blanks in there..
(similar to your solution)

the problem I was (am) having is that the crystal on this board is 16MHz.. and the end board I am trying to put the chip in is a 8MHz board...  so the hobby king cable would fix that!


question:

I see the hobby king cable mention needing to beused with an AVR programmer..etc..etc..

would the Arduino/IDE suffice in this instance as well? or does one need a special DEDICATED programing hardware?

(I have only ever used the Arduino/IDE for flashing bootloaders)

thanks

Coding Badly

I see the hobby king cable mention needing to beused with an AVR programmer..etc..etc..


Correct.  That product is just a cable.

Quote
would the Arduino/IDE suffice in this instance as well? or does one need a special DEDICATED programing hardware?


What did you use for a programmer?  An Arduino running the ArduinoISP sketch?

Bear in mind that cable has a 10 pin female connector on it.

xl97

thanks for reply..

I understand its just a cabled.. (it says needs AVR programmer)

I wondering it NEEDS to be a USBasp/USBTiny (or whatever) type programmer (ie: a dedicated piece of hardware)..

or if I can use my Arduino as ISP 

(like I have in the past with flashing blank 328P dip chips.. and others.. or even using Optiloader sketch on Arduino and loading Optiboot to chips)



my current 'situation' is..

I have that 1ISoG board linked to above..  (this has a 16MHz external crystal on board)

the blank chips I am flashing with this 1ISoG board, are going INTO a 8MHz external resonator pcb..  (the final PCB is missing the ICSP headers from its design, so I working towards a solution to make this easier)

having this HobbyKing cable, means I can assemble the FINAL pcb's..and just flash in-line..

using the 1ISoG board..

I run into 'problems/new issues'..

the board used in FLASHING is 16MHz.. final board is a 8MHz board..

been all the map 'trying' to understand all the ins/outs of this process.. even trying to compile a new 8MHz version of Optiboot..

(although Im wondering what difference is between this new one and the Optiboot for Pro/Pro-Mini @ +3.3v/8MHz?..  Im hoping/asuming its because of the board used to flash.. and thats why I went the long way to compile a new Optiboot bootloader?)

anyways..

yes I see the jTAG cable has 10-pin header on it... but does it need to be used?

I read comments and got this pinout:

Pins of connector of this adaptor:
1 - VCC
2 - MOSI
3 - GND
6 - RESET
8 - SCK
10 - MISO

and the othe end only has 6 spring loads pogo-pins on it..

In my mind.. I am hoping to:

take the 10-pin connector on the end.. stick header pins/jumpers to:

1 - VCC
2 - MOSI
3 - GND
6 - RESET
8 - SCK
10 - MISO

and connect to my Arduino board to: (respectively matching above)

+5v
D11
GND
RESET
D13
D12


Load Arduino as ISP sketch to Duemilanove 2009 board..
(power down)
hook up jTag/flashing cable from above
(power on)
Open Arduino IDE
(select com port)
(select either this new Optiboot +3.3v/8Mhx version or.. just Arduino Pro/Pro-Mini +3.3v @ 8MHz from boards menu)
Burn bootloader

thanks!


hiduino

Yes, ArduinoISP is just another type of AVR programmer.

Don't assume the 10-pin header is always jtag.  This is still a ICSP 10-pin header interface.


take the 10-pin connector on the end.. stick header pins/jumpers to:

1 - VCC
2 - MOSI
3 - GND
6 - RESET
8 - SCK
10 - MISO

and connect to my Arduino board to: (respectively matching above)

+5v
D11
GND
RSET
D13
D12


It should be:
Code: [Select]

and connect to my Arduino board to: (respectively matching above)

+5v
D11
GND
D10 - This needs to generate the reset signal to the target.
D13
D12



SouthernAtHeart

Quote
take the 10-pin connector on the end.. stick header pins/jumpers to:

1 - VCC
2 - MOSI
3 - GND
6 - RESET
8 - SCK
10 - MISO

and connect to my Arduino board to: (respectively matching above)

+5v
D11
GND
RSET
D13
D12


I think you'll need pin 10 instead of reset?  This was mentioned early in this thread

xl97

sorry you are correct.. D10 should go to RESET...  (typo)


jTag was used as a 'generic' term for the cable..(nothing to do with pinout or order)  :)

thanks!


SouthernAtHeart


Edited my layout a bit, and will see how it works.  Yes the diode is for testing purposes, so I know it's flashed before soldering it on an important board.  I first designed it to sit inside the perimeter of the UNO, but then changed it so it sets on pins 8 thru 13, on the outside, with the chip on the very outside of the little 1" square board.  I have a tiny spring clamp, about like a clothes pin, I can clamp the chip on with that, visually inspect it for squareness, and flash away. 
I'll let you know how it works in about a month.

It did not work. :(  I think squeezing a chip to a bare board with a clothes pin is not sufficient.  I ordered a TQFP32 programmer (like a ziff socket) from china for $22

Docedison

Depends, I think on the 'size' of the clothes pin...  IMO
I programmed a whole lot of 18 pin soic processors the same way in the late 90's and I had perhaps 2 or 3 failures and those were the only chips that didn't come from one tube to the programmer and back in a second tube (I dropped them before programming them). I was frankly surprised to find it didn't

Doc
--> WA7EMS <--
"The solution of every problem is another problem." -Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
I do answer technical questions PM'd to me with whatever is in my clipboard

xl97

I have used the 1 inch square of goodness board to hold down a ATmega328P-AU chip and flash it.. (not optimal though)..

I have also tried the cable from Hobby King (posted above)..

worked fine too.. and alot easier too!

(again holding a cable to the chip to flash)

SouthernAtHeart

Hmm, I will check my schematic and try again.  If the TQFP package would've slipped a little when I tried it, what is the likelihood that I ruined the chip? I've always heard that they're pretty hard to brick. If I can't get it working ill solder one on and see if it works but if it doesn't work then I still won't know if its because I bricked it earlier.

xl97

I 'believe I bricked one using the 1ISoG board..

its a very 'tight' space.. with components all around it.. a slip would not be good! :)

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