Go Down

Topic: COMPLAINT: Starter kit components not fitting (Read 12 times) previous topic - next topic

nass

I have a starter kit from Mouser bought Jan'13. I'm on Project 5, and...

1) The base of the potentiometer is too wide to fit as per the book diagram. It stretches 5 holes across, in the book the diagram shows it as 2. I cannot make the circuit in the book.
also
2) The header short end is too short to fit into the servo female end.

Now, I've fixed (2) by using short leads instead, which as a bodgejob looks like it'll work. But I'm wondering how to tackle 1 at the moment, trying to redo the diagram.

This, and all the other QC issues like the wires being the wrong colours in the book (or in the kit?) really isn't helpful. There are QC issues with the kit that need to be addressed.
Photography nut trying to make the flux capacitor of macro pho

nass

Update

Yet more issues

3) The potentiometer 'base' just doesn't fit well into the board at all and whilst the circuit I've made works, it's all over the place unless I press down very very hard on the base. Basically the connection is wrong, it needs force to make it work. With force it works exactly as expected.

4) I also discovered that the white leads in this mouser kit actually vary in length, this isn't terribly helpful when you're forced to rely on these because the supplied header pins are too short on the short side to work with the supplied servo

5) oh and the servo isn't like the diagram in the book either. In the book circuit the leads are from the top down black, red, white, but on the supplied servo the order is different, black, white, red. Obviously this has circuit implications, using header pins as instructed would have reversed white and red.

This sort of "complete lack of combined QC" is seriously poor. And considering a whole bunch of further projects depend on these components, what, exactly, am I supposed to do now? Whose responsibility are these kits, Arduino or Mouser?

Photography nut trying to make the flux capacitor of macro pho

nass

Update

3) The reason the potentiometer base doesn't fit well is because of the pin shapes. They're metal strips that measure 1.05mm wide and .29mm thick at the breadboard end, but this thin shaft is only 3.9mm long at which point the width broadens to 1.98mm. I do not have a tool to measure the breadboard holes; that wider shaft doesn't fit in the hole but the length of thin shaft isn't long enough to make contact unless you push it down hard.

Presumably I need to solder header pins onto the ends to make it work as intended. I don't have the first clue about soldering, anyone throw me a bone?
Photography nut trying to make the flux capacitor of macro pho

Retroplayer

A bone regarding soldering?

You will need a soldering iron and some solder at a minimum. The solder is made of a metal that will melt at relatively low temperatures (relatively for metal). To get a good solder joint, make sure that you are heating both surfaces equally and apply the solder to the point where your two surfaces touch. The solder will melt and will flow along the metal. The reason for making sure that both surfaces are fully heated is that solder flows on hot surfaces, but puddles on cold surfaces. So, you would have a weak connection (called a cold solder joint.)

Generally, don't apply more solder than you need and only use solder meant for electronics (not plumbing or 'electrical' solder for eaxmple.)

Obviously the iron will get hot, so either buy a stand or an iron with a stand, and keep your fingers out of the way.

If you have the cash, get a good soldering station that has a temperature control. This is a tool that you will end up using quite often if you are getting into electronics as a hobby.

nass

Photography nut trying to make the flux capacitor of macro pho

Go Up