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Topic: Newbie question about reading a fritzing diagram (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

damianest

Hello folks.  I've recently started tinkering with the arduino uno and I've been loving it.  My first project was a simply PIR sensor with a piezo alarm and an LED.  Eventually I plan to add some kind of twitter/sms notification to it.

Anyway, and again, this is a total newbie question, but I am having trouble understanding this fritzing diagram, specifically the wiring of the ground and the potentiometer.  I circled the part that confuses me.  Do I run two different grounds, or do I solder two wiresso they split at a certain point?  I'm trying not to use a breadboard for this.

Thank you.

-Damian

Arch, Debian, BSD, ARCH HURD
Arduino Uno, Arduino Nano, Arduino Mini
http://www.estebanrules.com
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@esteban

outofoptions

You connect all grounds, somehow/somewhere, together so you will have a common reference throughout the whole 'system'.  How you do that is pretty much up to you.  Whatever makes most sense with the materials you have on hand.

American2020

You can go from 1 GND of your arduino, just to your potentiometer, and from the other, go to the LCD and solder a wire between the 2 grounds.

Also for the 5V you can try getting out from the board with 2 wires, it's not need for it to go from 5V to potentiometer and from there to the LCD it can be, 5V potentiometer and 5V LCD

My 3x3x3 Led Cube

[url=http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/topic,1642

JimboZA

Quote
Whatever makes most sense with the materials you have on hand.


Terminal block strip is very useful, as is tag strip, both of which come in a variety of shapes and sizes.
My hovercraft is full of eels.

No PMs for help please.
DO NOT power servos from Arduino 5V: give them their own power and connect the grounds.

JoshD


You can go from 1 GND of your arduino, just to your potentiometer, and from the other, go to the LCD and solder a wire between the 2 grounds.


The grounds are already connected on the arduino.  No need to solder a wire between them.

majenko



You can go from 1 GND of your arduino, just to your potentiometer, and from the other, go to the LCD and solder a wire between the 2 grounds.


The grounds are already connected on the arduino.  No need to solder a wire between them.

He means the two grounds on the LCD, not the Arduino...

American2020



You can go from 1 GND of your arduino, just to your potentiometer, and from the other, go to the LCD and solder a wire between the 2 grounds.


The grounds are already connected on the arduino.  No need to solder a wire between them.


Yes, the wire I was talking about is between the 2 he needs on the LCD is the "pink" wire I added in the diagram ;)

Perhaps I wasn't clear enough, but hopefully he will get the idea :)
My 3x3x3 Led Cube

[url=http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/topic,1642

JoshD



Yes, the wire I was talking about is between the 2 he needs on the LCD is the "pink" wire I added in the diagram ;)

Perhaps I wasn't clear enough, but hopefully he will get the idea :)


Bah, my mistake.  That's what I get for posting before I've had coffee.  I see it now.

bmcc

What's the deal with these diagrams anyways?  How do you guys visualize what is going on in a more complex circuit when everyone, from what I've seen so far in Arduino land, hands this out as the diagram?

retrolefty


What's the deal with these diagrams anyways?  How do you guys visualize what is going on in a more complex circuit when everyone, from what I've seen so far in Arduino land, hands this out as the diagram?



Well that are some of us that hate then and refuse to use them. It's a poor substitute for a proper schematic drawing, but it does seem to appeal to the "arduino artists" types.  ;)

damianest

#10
Apr 16, 2013, 06:06 pm Last Edit: Apr 16, 2013, 06:08 pm by damianest Reason: 1
Thanks for the help folks, I understand it now.

Concerning reading diagrams, seeing as how I am a beginner I have been using fritzing primarily but I would prefer to learn how to read traditional schematics...can anyone recommend a good resource on where to start to learn?

Thank you.
Arch, Debian, BSD, ARCH HURD
Arduino Uno, Arduino Nano, Arduino Mini
http://www.estebanrules.com
http://www.estebanworldhistory.com
@esteban

damianest


Quote
Whatever makes most sense with the materials you have on hand.


Terminal block strip is very useful, as is tag strip, both of which come in a variety of shapes and sizes.


Ok thank you.  So basically if I wasn't using a breadboard I could connect all the grounds to the terminal strip?

Thank you.
Arch, Debian, BSD, ARCH HURD
Arduino Uno, Arduino Nano, Arduino Mini
http://www.estebanrules.com
http://www.estebanworldhistory.com
@esteban

outofoptions


Thanks for the help folks, I understand it now.

Concerning reading diagrams, seeing as how I am a beginner I have been using fritzing primarily but I would prefer to learn how to read traditional schematics...can anyone recommend a good resource on where to start to learn?

Thank you.
As I recall Fritzing also does traditional schematics under a separate tab.  I played with if a little.  The traditional diagraming with it was ugly.

bmcc

If you're familiar with Digikey, they have a web based drawing tool you can test out without installing anything. http://www.digikey.com/schemeit
Look at the left side and get familiar with the symbols for each part.

There's also xcircuit which is free and a good drawing program- especially if using unix.
If you want a drawing and simulation program that isn't too expensive there is CircuitLogix.  Multisim is pretty expensive I think.

damianest

Thanks for the info.  I do indeed use Linux / BSD.

Thanks for the suggestions and help folks.
Arch, Debian, BSD, ARCH HURD
Arduino Uno, Arduino Nano, Arduino Mini
http://www.estebanrules.com
http://www.estebanworldhistory.com
@esteban

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