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Author Topic: My camera discontinued  (Read 2264 times)
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Dallas, TX
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To the OP, while it was perhaps inevitable, I can feel your pain.  I've never handled a Hasselblad, but they certainly were classic, iconic cameras.

Yes, I'm a little surprised they stayed in production as long as they did. Fortunately, there seems to be plenty of used stock around which will probably outlast me.  smiley
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Ayer, Massachusetts, USA
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Yes, I'm a little surprised they stayed in production as long as they did. Fortunately, there seems to be plenty of used stock around which will probably outlast me.  smiley
Well the supply of film for the camera and chemicals to develop it may be more of an issue than just the body and lenses.  While medium format and large format still have toeholds and it has become a niche market, I would imagine the consumer 35mm film infrastructure to completely disappear within the next few years.
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Yes, I'm a little surprised they stayed in production as long as they did. Fortunately, there seems to be plenty of used stock around which will probably outlast me.  smiley
Well the supply of film for the camera and chemicals to develop it may be more of an issue than just the body and lenses.  While medium format and large format still have toeholds and it has become a niche market, I would imagine the consumer 35mm film infrastructure to completely disappear within the next few years.

There is a lab in Dallas that still processes different kinds of film and does drum scans of the negatives. There is not as good a selection of films now.

Yes, with the DSLRs available today, there is really no advantage to shoot 35mm anymore.
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BHZ, MG, Brazil
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I read that news a few days ago too. I follow several Photography channels on Google Currents.

The advantage of this news for you is that this model of the Hasselblad will have their prices skyrocketed in a few months/years. They'll become a desired collectors item. If I were you I'd hold on to mine and keep it in working state. Who knows, maybe in a few years you might be able to sell it for a several thousand dollars.

About a year ago I sold a Canon EOS 500n (35mm, very basic, entry-level SLR camera) for about US$ 350. It was in  practically New In box, with original manuals, box, lenses kit, 2 new unopened 35mm film rolls (FUJI), UV filter, etc. I inherited it from my uncle, who I believe didn't run more than 2 rolls of film through it.

I still have 4 very old 35mm cameras: an Olympus Trip 35, a very old Kodak, a Minolta (SLR) and a Pentax (SLR) [can't remember the models]. I know that my Pentax has seen a substantial raise in market value in the last few years.

My day-by-day cameras however are a Canon A620 (it stays in the car all the time) and a Nikon D7000.
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I sincerely hope that the prices don't rise any time soon. I still use my Hasselblad and enjoy getting great deals on used equipment. Many of the lenses have been out of production for years and their prices haven't appreciated as a result. I think it will be quite some time before it becomes a collectable.
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