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Topic: Best way to power Arduino (Without USB or AC adapter) [solved] (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

pantzmaster

May 12, 2013, 07:49 am Last Edit: May 12, 2013, 09:31 am by pantzmaster Reason: 1
Just a quick and simple question.

I'm thinking of getting a Bluetooth shield for my Arduino so I can experiment with sending serial values over bluetooth. Just wondering what is the best way to give it it's own "stand alone" power? This page (http://playground.arduino.cc/Learning/9VBatteryAdapter) seems good and covers running it off a 9v battery, but just wondering if there's any other methods I should be aware of or that are considered better?

Thanks!

HazardsMind

Regular 9V batteries only last for about 30 minutes before they're dead, so an alternative would be some rechargeable. Some like these.
My GitHub:
https://github.com/AndrewMascolo?tab=repositories

pantzmaster

#2
May 12, 2013, 09:04 am Last Edit: May 12, 2013, 09:10 am by pantzmaster Reason: 1

Regular 9V batteries only last for about 30 minutes before they're dead, so an alternative would be some rechargeable. Some like these.


Thanks, and that will be fine for an Arduino UNO? According to this page (http://arduino.cc/en/Main/arduinoBoardUno) the recommended Input Voltage is 7-12v. Just want to make sure I'm understanding that correctly! :)

Also, would something like this be ok?

http://australia.rs-online.com/web/p/9-volt-rechargeable-batteries/6708757/

HazardsMind

Those batteries are just as bad as regular 9v batteries, if not worse and they die even faster. The thing is, they don't supply enough current, and the only way you would be able to get more time out of them is if you double or triple them up (in parallel, not series). That's why I recommend getting a rechargeable battery pack. They put out a lot of current (great amount for the arduino) and they can be recharged about 1000 times over, before they start to weaken.

You can use the batteries in your link, but you will need to constantly recharge them every 10 - 15 minutes. But if your ok with that and it won't be too much trouble, then get them.
My GitHub:
https://github.com/AndrewMascolo?tab=repositories

pantzmaster


Those batteries are just as bad as regular 9v batteries, if not worse and they die even faster. The thing is, they don't supply enough current, and the only way you would be able to get more time out of them is if you double or triple them up (in parallel, not series). That's why I recommend getting a rechargeable battery pack. They put out a lot of current (great amount for the arduino) and they can be recharged about 1000 times over, before they start to weaken.

You can use the batteries in your link, but you will need to constantly recharge them every 10 - 15 minutes. But if your ok with that and it won't be too much trouble, then get them.


Ok, thanks for your help!

MichaelMeissner

I like chargers that are meant for cell phones.  I happen to have an EVOpower 5000 that I picked up from Amazon about a year ago for $20-25, and I've tested it, and it can power an Arduino for about 4 days running the blink program.  The unit I have has about 5000 maH of power, and can power two separate devices.  You can get them in all sorts of different capacities and number of charging plugs at different price points. http://www.amazon.com/EZOPower-Universal-External-Rechargeable-NookColor/dp/B004I0F82I/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1368363405&sr=8-3&keywords=evopower+5000

I've seen this shield that take 6 AAA batteries that is more self contained for powering an Arduino: https://www.tindie.com/products/elproducts/battery-shield/.  And this shield from sparkfun for use with 3.7 volt lipo batteries, but I haven't used them: https://www.sparkfun.com/products/10711

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