Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
Author Topic: Voltmeter Design (analogue)  (Read 809 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Offline Offline
Edison Member
*
Karma: 29
Posts: 2453
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Where on earth do I start? lol

Since I don't know the values of the resistors, how can I determine say R1's value?  I'm confused where do i start? at the bottom with the lowest voltage and work
my way up? or calculate them all?


* analogMultiMetercircuit.png (134.9 KB, 789x1040 - viewed 30 times.)
Logged

Rapa Nui
Offline Offline
Edison Member
*
Karma: 60
Posts: 2073
Pukao hats cleaning services
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Hint: if you measure 0.1V with 100uA meter FCD, it has RO=0.1V/0.0001=1kohm resistance itself. R1 must be such it creates a volatage divider 10:1 .. so the resistor R1 will be probably 9k (you have to calculate it). And so on upwards.. smiley
Have fun!
« Last Edit: June 10, 2013, 02:12:56 am by pito » Logged

Global Moderator
UK
Offline Offline
Brattain Member
*****
Karma: 302
Posts: 26312
I don't think you connected the grounds, Dave.
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Ohm's Law.
If 100uA is the full scale deflection of the meter, you know the resistance of the meter movement itself, so all you need to do is plug in the voltage, and out pops the value of the resistor.
Logged

"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.

Offline Offline
Edison Member
*
Karma: 29
Posts: 2453
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

That simple?...

I was worried about the total resistance throwing off the accuracy off on a 100v input so then...

R1?'s value...

1v / 0.001
= 1000ohm resistor?

10v / 0.001
= 10000 ohm resistor.

Like that?

But surely the total resistance will effect a 100v input reading?

Logged

Rapa Nui
Offline Offline
Edison Member
*
Karma: 60
Posts: 2073
Pukao hats cleaning services
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Quote
1v / 0.001
= 1000ohm resistor?

10v / 0.001
= 10000 ohm resistor.

Like that?
No, certainly not. Follow the algorithm I described above..
Logged

Offline Offline
Edison Member
*
Karma: 29
Posts: 2453
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Hint: if you measure 0.1V with 100uA meter FCD, it has RO=0.1V/0.0001=1kohm resistance itself. R1 must be such it creates a volatage divider 10:1

0.1V/0.0001 (0.1ma)
= 1000 ohms

fair enough.

R1 =  I've been staring at this for so long I've gone completely blank.

Brain freeze!, 10:1 so I multiply 1k * 10 then? lol - no seriously i've gone so blank I think i may have to call a doctor :O



Logged

Rapa Nui
Offline Offline
Edison Member
*
Karma: 60
Posts: 2073
Pukao hats cleaning services
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Study "voltage divider" or "resistive divider". It is your homework, isn't it?
Logged

Global Moderator
UK
Offline Offline
Brattain Member
*****
Karma: 302
Posts: 26312
I don't think you connected the grounds, Dave.
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Quote
Study "voltage divider" or "resistive divider".
In a voltmeter, they're called "multipliers".

Two resistors in series, with an applied voltage of 10 volts give a current of 100uA.
One of the resistors is 1000 ohms. Solve for the other series resistor.
Logged

"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.

Offline Offline
Edison Member
*
Karma: 29
Posts: 2453
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Study "voltage divider" or "resistive divider". It is your homework, isn't it?

Certainly is... but it's a public holiday today smiley or i'd be asking a professional who would give me the answer to R1 .

Volts/TR = amps
amps * resistance = voltage at given point

would it help if i said it's not my homework ? and I need it to build a multimeter? smiley-grin
Logged

Offline Offline
Edison Member
*
Karma: 29
Posts: 2453
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Quote
Study "voltage divider" or "resistive divider".
In a voltmeter, they're called "multipliers".

Two resistors in series, with an applied voltage of 10 volts give a current of 100uA.
One of the resistors is 1000 ohms. Solve for the other series resistor.


ok then... thanks!
Logged

Rapa Nui
Offline Offline
Edison Member
*
Karma: 60
Posts: 2073
Pukao hats cleaning services
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Quote
or i'd be asking a professional who would give me the answer to R1 .
A school work expects the pupil will study something - books, papers, wikipedia, etc. You might not have a privilege to ask experts all the time in the future smiley
Enjoy holidays!
Logged

Offline Offline
Edison Member
*
Karma: 29
Posts: 2453
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

I do study... not sure what brought you to that conclusion, this is a simple case of "logic fail" for me....   so i'm taking a break and then i'll approach it again!
Logged

Global Moderator
UK
Offline Offline
Brattain Member
*****
Karma: 302
Posts: 26312
I don't think you connected the grounds, Dave.
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Kirchoff's Law tells you that the current flowing in the (very simple) circuit is the same at all points.
You know what the applied voltage is, you know what you want the current to be, and you know the value of one of the series resistances.
It isn't logic that is failing you, it is simple arithmetic.
Logged

"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.

SW Scotland
Offline Offline
Edison Member
*
Karma: 17
Posts: 1389
Arduino rocks
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Cribbing is not an education - unless copying-without-thinking is how it's done these days.
If we give you the answers you learn nothing.
From your existing knowledge and the information others have already given (read it!),  prepare your own answers as per the test sheet you have, writing down all your assumptions and your calculations.
Then we will advise, if necessary, where, and why, you are wrong.
Logged

Offline Offline
Edison Member
*
Karma: 29
Posts: 2453
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Cribbing my ass...

Logged

Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
Jump to: