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Topic: Putting Arduino's in Space - Open Source Satellite Project Launched (Read 2987 times) previous topic - next topic

ppl4world

Hi, we just launched our open source satellite project on KickStarter - http:\\www.ardusat.org

It is an ambitious project where we provide 5-10 arduinos with 25+ sensors connected via I2C on a satellite for anyone to write their own space based application or experiment, upload it to the satellite and run it in space. Users can also steer the 3 on-board cameras and take their own pictures from Earth, the Moon and Planets or star constellations.

I was wondering if someone here has done a similarly ambitious project (many Arduino's, many sensors, I2C, remote access) and would be willing to share his or her advice.

Thanks a lot in advance,

Peter

robtillaart

#1
Jun 16, 2012, 10:18 am Last Edit: Jun 16, 2012, 10:20 am by robtillaart Reason: 1
Sounds interesting, but afaik it has not done before and IIRC the specs of the Arduino do not really match the environment of space - temperature / radiation / humidity/etc

There are experiments don with arduinos and weather balloons. I dont have a link but I assume google will find them quite fast for you.
OK weather ballons are not space but you probably can learn a thing or two from those experiments.

Rob Tillaart

Nederlandse sectie - http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html -
(Please do not PM for private consultancy)

nickgammon

Crossposting ... trouble.

Your other thread has been deleted.
Please post technical questions on the forum, not by personal message. Thanks!

More info: http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

nickgammon

Please post technical questions on the forum, not by personal message. Thanks!

More info: http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

ppl4world

my mistake, sincere apologies. I was not sure where the best place would be. Thank you for deleting it and again, apologies for the trouble I caused!

JoeN

Not seeing anything at http:\\www.ardusat.org yet.  Is that the right link?

For what it's worth, computer hardware flown in space is specially radiation hardened and redundant.  The radiation environment in space is different than that at the surface of earth, i.e. there is a significant one.  Some information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiation_hardening

Quote
Radiation hardening is a method of designing and testing electronic components and systems to make them resistant to damage or malfunctions caused by ionizing radiation (particle radiation and high-energy electromagnetic radiation),[1] such as would be encountered in outer space, high-altitude flight, around nuclear reactors, particle accelerators, during nuclear accidents or nuclear warfare.

Most radiation-hardened chips are based on their commercial equivalents, with some manufacturing and design variations that reduce the susceptibility to radiation damage. Due to the extensive development and testing required to produce a radiation-tolerant design of a microelectronic chip, radiation-hardened chips tend to lag behind the cutting-edge of developments.


I am not sure anyone would fly non-radiation hardened computers.  Also, I don't think any of the off-the-shelf commercial sensors would be all that useful for scientific experiments, but who knows.
I will never ask you to do anything that I wouldn't do myself.

AWOL

Quote
For what it's worth, computer hardware flown in space is specially radiation hardened and redundant.

True for commercial grade spacecraft with long planned missions, but not true for a lot of hobbyist and academic projects; there are even craft in production based on smartphones.

Mission-critical  functions like manoeuvring and orientation are controlled by dedicated rad-hard circuits, but day-to-day sensor handling can be performed by much cheaper hardware.

I think Surrey University had craft based on commercial grade transputers ( from my recollection, there weren't any other grades!) in the early 90s
"Pete, it's a fool (who) looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.
I speak for myself, not Arduino.

cogitoergosum

Is it possible to have a version of ArduSat as a means for two-way communication ?

I found a number of projects that do satellite tracking. I didn't understand how could one just 'connect' to a satellite and communicate two-way without any fee involved. Perhaps, the fee part was implicit but, then, I got curious. Can I have "my own" satellite and the satellite tracking code ?

Yes, I am a satellite n00b, so, please do feel free to throw manuals at me.

RudiAhlers


retrolefty


Is it possible to have a version of ArduSat as a means for two-way communication ?

I found a number of projects that do satellite tracking. I didn't understand how could one just 'connect' to a satellite and communicate two-way without any fee involved. Perhaps, the fee part was implicit but, then, I got curious. Can I have "my own" satellite and the satellite tracking code ?

Yes, I am a satellite n00b, so, please do feel free to throw manuals at me.


Ham radio operators have been using satellites as repeaters for many decades also without fee.

Lefty

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