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Topic: Classic 70's TV game reproduced on the Arduino/AMTEGA328 (Read 8 times) previous topic - next topic

zx80nut

Hi.
Thought you might be interested in one of my projects.
The aim of this is to faithfully (as accurately as possible) recreate all four paddle games (Tennis, Soccer, Squash and Solo) that were on the 70's "pong"-type game consoles.
Here are actual screenshots of it in operation...


Full details and sourcecode is to be found on my page here:
http://searle.hostei.com/grant/AVRPong/index.html

Please also see my main page for other projects and collections here:
http://searle.hostei.com/grant/index.html

The display routine is a modified version of the TV out library file, the game code is all my own work.
I have spent a lot of time with datasheets and screenshots to make this game as accurate as possible. I will be tweaking it a little bit over the next week or so to increase accuracy, but any timing changes will be tiny - you won't notice, I just want to be accurate.

As it is on a free hosting service, the site occasionally goes down. If the links don't work then please try a bit later.

BTW. All diagrams are hand-drawn by me using Visio.

Hope it's of use to you.

Regards.

Grant

cr0sh

This is really nice!

I took a look around your site - man, I've always wanted to try my hand at something like your simple 6809 or Z80 (or CP/M!) projects, but the thing that stops me is not owning an EPROM burner (I've probably got all the chips, otherwise).

I wouldn't have any real use for such a system, other than to say "I did it" - though I think building such systems would help me understand other things I own better, to an extent. For instance, my first computer system (which I still own - and it still works) from when I was a kid (30 years ago when I was 10) was my TRS-80 Color Computer 2. I also have an Altair 8800 that needs a bunch of TLC to get it running again (and it has the Z80 upgrade - sadly, I didn't get one with an 8080, but I'm not really complaining). I think simple computer system projects like you have posted would help me to better understand how these other systems I own are put together.

...anyhow - thanks for the Pong project, and all the others; it's nice to see these things still being collected and cared about!
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

AWOL

Quote
but the thing that stops me is not owning an EPROM burner (

You could probably emulate an EPROM with a Mega at 1970's microprocessor clock speeds :)
"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.

cr0sh


Quote
but the thing that stops me is not owning an EPROM burner (

You could probably emulate an EPROM with a Mega at 1970's microprocessor clock speeds :)


Well - I could probably emulate nearly the whole thing; the thing is, I have a ton of old 1970s era components - when I find them, I grab 'em - I probably have 10 Z-80 processors, for instance, and more than a few 6809 processors. I also have many of the old EPROMs - 2716, 2732, 2764, 27128, 27256 - I just don't have a way to program them. I have tons of 74LSxxx logic too; basically I believe I have everything I need to build some old 1970s era microcomputer (not counting my Altair or my Heathkit 6800 trainer) - except for an EPROM programmer.

One of these days I'm just going to have to break down and either build one, or purchase an old used one (for a bit of money - it seems those things have kept their value somewhat over the years).
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

zx80nut

#4
Jun 29, 2013, 12:23 pm Last Edit: Jun 29, 2013, 12:25 pm by zx80nut Reason: 1
I knocked up my programmer a few years ago - it's still running on a solderless breadboard. It programs 2764 up to the big 32 pin ones. It's running on a PIC16F877 (could be done on a 40-pin ATMEL device instead, though).

It's driven at 115200 baud via the serial port, and is menu driven.
To upload, simply paste the contents of the HEX file to the terminal window.

I need to knock up a schematic of what I did (away for some of the next few weeks, but will do when I get spare time).

Grant

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