Go Down

Topic: Noob question about return (Read 330 times) previous topic - next topic

Hi Arduino programmers,

Im jazzy gerard 2 day old new to the programming world from arduino.
I alreay now how to program in JAL but I find the arduino programming and all types of boards
very interesting, user friendly and easy to use!

now I'm busy with making a summary of all the refrences on the arduino website. but i have e problem with the return.

let me state my question with an example

int checkSensor() {
if (analaogRead(0) > 400){

return 1;

else

return 0;
{
{

so if i understand the explanation this means if the value from the reading on analog pin 0 is grater then 400 the program goes back to the beginning and starts over from there and a 1 is returned. What returns the 1? the checksensor? the analog reading? 

probably for you guys this is easy but i'm just a beginner! :)

best regards!

majenko

Hey JazzyGerard.   Enjoying your LED modules?  ;)

Right...  The return statement sets the value that is returned from the function call.  The function terminates at that point.

So, if you create the function:

Code: [Select]


int checkSensor() {
  if (analaogRead(0) > 400) {
    return 1;
  } else {
    return 0;
  }
}


you can then call that function and use the return value in some way.  When you call the function, either 1 or 0 will be returned to where you called the function.  The function is in effect replaced by the return value.

For example, if you then had the code:
Code: [Select]

int sensorHigh = checkSensor();

the variable sensorHigh would either contain a 0 or a 1 depending on the value of analog pin 0.  In effect the code is equivalent to one of:
Code: [Select]

int sensorHigh = 1;

or
Code: [Select]

int sensorHigh = 0;

depenging on the value of analog pin 0.

The definition of the checkSensor() function (int checkSensor()) includes the "return type" - int in this case.  This is the kind of variable that the function can return - whole numbers between -32768 and 32767 for this example.

Hahaha!

yes they save me a lot of work during prototyping!!!!!
is there also a 12V version?

thanks for the detailed explanation I totally understand it now!!!

best regards

majenko


Hahaha!

yes they save me a lot of work during prototyping!!!!!
is there also a 12V version?

I have done 12V ones before, yes.  I have 560? resistor arrays here that I use for them.  I can do any custom combinations you want too :)

okey thanks! i will contact you on ebay with my desires!!  :)

best regards!

Go Up
 


Please enter a valid email to subscribe

Confirm your email address

We need to confirm your email address.
To complete the subscription, please click the link in the email we just sent you.

Thank you for subscribing!

Arduino
via Egeo 16
Torino, 10131
Italy