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Topic: Noob question about return (Read 307 times) previous topic - next topic

Hi Arduino programmers,

Im jazzy gerard 2 day old new to the programming world from arduino.
I alreay now how to program in JAL but I find the arduino programming and all types of boards
very interesting, user friendly and easy to use!

now I'm busy with making a summary of all the refrences on the arduino website. but i have e problem with the return.

let me state my question with an example

int checkSensor() {
if (analaogRead(0) > 400){

return 1;

else

return 0;
{
{

so if i understand the explanation this means if the value from the reading on analog pin 0 is grater then 400 the program goes back to the beginning and starts over from there and a 1 is returned. What returns the 1? the checksensor? the analog reading? 

probably for you guys this is easy but i'm just a beginner! :)

best regards!

majenko

Hey JazzyGerard.   Enjoying your LED modules?  ;)

Right...  The return statement sets the value that is returned from the function call.  The function terminates at that point.

So, if you create the function:

Code: [Select]


int checkSensor() {
  if (analaogRead(0) > 400) {
    return 1;
  } else {
    return 0;
  }
}


you can then call that function and use the return value in some way.  When you call the function, either 1 or 0 will be returned to where you called the function.  The function is in effect replaced by the return value.

For example, if you then had the code:
Code: [Select]

int sensorHigh = checkSensor();

the variable sensorHigh would either contain a 0 or a 1 depending on the value of analog pin 0.  In effect the code is equivalent to one of:
Code: [Select]

int sensorHigh = 1;

or
Code: [Select]

int sensorHigh = 0;

depenging on the value of analog pin 0.

The definition of the checkSensor() function (int checkSensor()) includes the "return type" - int in this case.  This is the kind of variable that the function can return - whole numbers between -32768 and 32767 for this example.

Hahaha!

yes they save me a lot of work during prototyping!!!!!
is there also a 12V version?

thanks for the detailed explanation I totally understand it now!!!

best regards

majenko


Hahaha!

yes they save me a lot of work during prototyping!!!!!
is there also a 12V version?

I have done 12V ones before, yes.  I have 560? resistor arrays here that I use for them.  I can do any custom combinations you want too :)

okey thanks! i will contact you on ebay with my desires!!  :)

best regards!

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