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Topic: PIC uC (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

tinyPlus

Hello Jeff,


Hi...Is it possible for arduino to also use a PIC micro.....


have a look at the  pinguino project. They use both 8 bit (18f2550, 4550, 26j50, 47j53) and 32 bit PICs (32MX220/250, 32MX440, 32MX795).

The IDE is written in Python and is similar to the arduino IDE.



Additional information about compatability pinguino vs. arduino you can get here.

Oliver

hiduino

There is also the Chipino which is in an Aruidno Uno form factor.
https://www.tindie.com/products/elproducts/chipino-module/


joe mcd

The Arduino environment is well supported on Pic32 but not on earlier chips.
See: http://chipkit.net

The key issue is not the IDE (written in portable Java), but the compiler and libraries.  Chipkit & vendors have put a lot of effort into converting over many popular Arduino libraries.

Quote
Arduino was secretly a marketing department for Atmel

From Atmel's point of view, Arduino is an outstanding marketing tool.  Nothing secret or unethical involved.  The CEO of Arduino and a founder of Atmel AVR appeared together onstage at the last New York Maker Faire.  They were announcing the new 32bit line beginning with the Due.

Atmel's rival Microchip took notice and launched the Chipkit venture.  In other words they knew a bandwagon when they saw it.
In the 32bit world, the chips are very similar.  Having chip competition is good for the Arduino community.

Quote
PIC is MUCH faster

This is a misleading comparison between 8bit and 32bit.  We must compare the 32bit offerings with each other.

The main practical advantage of the 32bit PIC chips is their 5volt tolerance on digital inputs.  In addition Microchip has some DIP versions not just surface mount.

We can safely ignore the quasi-religious dispute over Harvard Architecture.  Big Endians vs. Little Endians (see Gulliver's Travels)


bperrybap


Quote
PIC is MUCH faster

This is a misleading comparison between 8bit and 32bit.  We must compare the 32bit offerings with each other.

The main practical advantage of the 32bit PIC chips is their 5volt tolerance on digital inputs.  In addition Microchip has some DIP versions not just surface mount.

We can safely ignore the quasi-religious dispute over Harvard Architecture.  Big Endians vs. Little Endians (see Gulliver's Travels)



My "speed" comment was respect to comparing the two 28 pin DIP microcontrollers I mentioned.
It is not misleading in that it was a direct comparison of what you are getting in those 28 pin packages
for the same amount of money. It wasn't meant as a generic PIC vs AVR statement.

I think the Harvard Architecture is somewhat of an issue since having it makes the code "ugly",
often slower , and often non portable across other platforms since it doesn't allow direct access to the data
and requires access routines.
Think of how much simpler things would be for newbies if they didn't' have to mess with all the PROGMEM stuff.
Just declare your data const and be done with it.
They also often surprised that a string literal ends up chewing up the very limited ram on the AVRs.


--- bill

SirNickity

There's a lot of whining in this thread....  If you don't like AVR, don't use it.  Arduino is far from the only beginner framework out there.  And as noted, there have been plenty of ports to other platforms with various degrees of compatibility.  These can be grafted in to the Arduino IDE if you're so inclined, although the IDE is my least favorite thing about the Arduino platform, so I dunno why that would be anyone's goal.

Harvard architecture is not sloppy, nor "ugly".  It's a rather elegant way of keeping the executable instructions safe from accidental (or not) harm.  If PCs had used something similar, we wouldn't constantly be fighting buffer overflow security holes.  Not that it's a perfect solution.  Every choice has its compromises.  Again, if you don't like it, you have PLENTY of other options.  Coming on here and preaching to the world about how it's so obviously flawed is going to change no minds at Atmel, nor Arduino.  Also, I don't think Arduino is going to abandon AVR since backward compatibility seems to be a high priority to them.  I don't think that implies any devious relationships, I think it's just part of supporting a mature product portfolio.  AVR was, and is, a fine choice.

Not using AVRs because of a serial pinout or FTDI is just silly though.  It's an electronics development platform.  You can't come up with a way of converting 2x3 to 1x6?  You're not going to get very far in this hobby if that's all it takes to stop you.

Sorry for my grumpiness.  :P

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