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Topic: Talking clock (Read 2577 times) previous topic - next topic

elac

Glad you got it to work.
There is a mistake in the talking clock example on line #194
Code: [Select]
if (heure12) {
should be
Code: [Select]
if (heure>12) {
It's all about the skills

bperrybap

Guys,
There is an actual issue with the "Talkie" library.
On operating systems that have file systems that support upper and lower case
characters in filenames, it will not compile "as is".
That is because the main library file
talkie.cpp includes the file "Talkie.h" and "Talkie.h" does not exist.
The header file name is "talkie.h" not "Talkie.h".
Since all the examples include the proper header file name, the
easiest solution is to go modify talkie.cpp and change
line 11 from
Code: [Select]
#include "Talkie.h"
to
Code: [Select]
#include "talkie.h"

This is one of the errors that gets masked from only working on Windows machines.

I opened an issue for it on the github project.

--- bill

Arduinoisme

I actually have a similar problem. When I use the talkie library it works correctly but I just cannot get it to identify the 'Talkie' keyword in "Talkie talkingclock;" Here is the part of my code where I am having trouble:

Code: [Select]

Talkie talkingclock;  //error for keyword talkie - unidentified.


The unusual thing is it still speaks when I use -
Code: [Select]

talkingclock.say(spGOOD);


Why is the error coming then? I'm happy it works but I do want to know why this is happening.

PaulS

Quote
but I do want to know why this is happening.

Then go to http://snippets-r-us.com. Here, not too surprisingly, we expect to see ALL of your code.

jafts

Hello All,
I am new here and  will do my best not to sound like bigbuck.
I love this talkie project. I have been playing around with it and absolutely love it, but I cannot seem to find much documentation on it.
I would like to be able to create my own words.
Can anyone point me to documentation on creating my own words? Perhaps a list of sounds that match up to a hex codes pattern?

When looking through the clock examples I see that the words 'Four' and 'Five" both beginning with the letter/sound 'F' start with completely different hex codes:
0x0C,0x18,0xB6,0x9A,0x01,0xC3 (beginning of 'four')
and
0x02,0xE8,0x3E,0x8C,0x01,0xDD (beginning of 'five')

So where can I figure out the proper hex code for a word like 'fox' also beginning with 'f'?



bperrybap

jafts,
this isn't token based or phoneme based.
From the talkie readme:

Quote
It is a software implementation of the Texas Instruments speech synthesis architecture (Linear Predictive Coding) from the late 1970s / early 1980s, as used on several popular applications:


For some additional information on adding words see issue #4 on the github page.
It isn't easy and requires using his freemat files down in his encorder directory.
It will also require doing some scripting and/or manual manipulation of the bit characters
to create the final C data initializers.

--- bill

jafts

Bill,
Thanks I am reading up on LPC.
I also did not realize the issues section was there on the github page, so thank you for pointing that out also.
It sounds like quite a bit of work but I will read through issue #4 more.
Are you aware of any library that might be as you say 'token' based?

In the end I intend to have a talking conversational bot.
Currently she only does text.
I hope to be able to contribute soon.
Thanks again for letting me hijack this thread

jafts

Quote
Are you aware of any library that might be as you say 'token' based?

I now see you last post in issue#4 on the github page https://github.com/going-digital/Talkie/issues/4 and will work from that too.
Thank you yet again!

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