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Topic: 110 volts (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

Keven Belanger

Where is the best place to start learning basic electronic/arduino control of 110v lamp/fan, etc.. Simply switching on/off as an electric switch do.

Thanks.

Keven

graymalkin

Nice big relay. Easy. Check the driving voltage, typically 12 volts, you should be able to switch 12v with a transistor then that can go to the coil of the relay which switches the larger current.  

Wiring would be: digitalPin - transistor Base (npn)
                          Gnd - collector
                          Emitor to relay coil pin one
                          12v to relay coil pin 2

Not sure on what transistor to use, depends on the current and voltage ratings. Check it against the draw of the circuit to switch (relay coil side, not relay switch side)

retrolefty

#2
Jul 11, 2010, 04:48 am Last Edit: Jul 11, 2010, 04:49 am by retrolefty Reason: 1
Quote
Where is the best place to start learning basic electronic/arduino control of 110v lamp/fan, etc.. Simply switching on/off as an electric switch do.


Typically for on/off control of AC power, a solid-state relay offers the simplest solution. It wires to the Arduino directly with the output pin and ground, no series resistor or switching transistor required. You do have to select the solid state relay to support the AC current requirements you want to switch. They can be a little costly but if you search surplus or E-bay sellers you can find bargains at times. Here is one example rated at 1 amp of AC current, so on the low side but small and useful for things like muffin fans or small lamps:

http://www.allelectronics.com/make-a-store/item/SRLY-19/1A-SOLID-STATE-RELAY-3-8VDC-CONTROL//1.html

Lefty

cr0sh

Quote
Where is the best place to start learning basic electronic/arduino control of 110v lamp/fan, etc.. Simply switching on/off as an electric switch do.


First off, what's your experience with household AC? The answer to that will indicate what we can advise you on. If you have -no- experience (wiring up a single lamp doesn't count), then I would suggest going down to your local big-box home-improvement center, purchasing a book on home electrical wiring and appliance repair, and studying that - before you try anything.

Nice big relay. Easy. Check the driving voltage, typically 12 volts, you should be able to switch 12v with a transistor then that can go to the coil of the relay which switches the larger current.
Household AC is not something to "play" with - it can kill you just for looking at it wrong. I can't tell you the number of times I've been "lucky"; she's a hard b*tch.

;)

Quote
Nice big relay. Easy. Check the driving voltage, typically 12 volts, you should be able to switch 12v with a transistor then that can go to the coil of the relay which switches the larger current.


This can work, but you need to check the contact ratings and such to make sure that the relay can handle the current being switched. Otherwise, you'll end up with a welded or burnt-out relay in short order.

Also, don't forget the snubber/flyback diode across the coil of the relay if you want to see your transistor live long.

Another thing to keep in mind: large currents can be controlled via a multi-relay setup, where one relay switches 24 VAC, which is then used to switch what is called a "contactor" relay (its basically a really big relay - you see them used in industrial and HVAC situations). The 24 VAC is generally provided using a step-down AC transformer; this is basically how your home AC unit works.

Also - if you want absolute safety, use two SPST or a single DPDT relay to switch both legs (neutral and hot) of the AC line at the same time (this is how the old AT power supplies of PCs were switched back in the day - but using a DPDT button switch, not a relay). This is actually better practice than simply switching the hot leg of the circuit.

Instead of relays, SSRs (Solid State Relays) offer an easy alternative; most can be switched using 5V TTL signals (like the Arduino outputs on its digital i/o lines) - you may or may not need a current limiting resistor on the ouput; check the specsheet for the SSR on current draw. The main disadvantage of an SSR can be cost; they are typically much more expensive than a similar relay. You also will typically need to mount them to a heatsink if you are going to be switching large currents. The advantages, though, are longer life, less noise, and no contacts to burn out.

Finally - always incorporate a ground into your project (ie, the case of the project box holding the AC controls would work well). You should also isolate the AC side of things well away from the controller, perhaps also incorporating an optoisolator design, so that transients, spikes, etc have no way to come back to the Arduino side of things (this is one area where you -don't- want to tie your grounds together, if it can be avoided).

Be careful.

:)
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

Keven Belanger

Maybe if I told you exactly what I want to do you will be able to told me exactly what I should use :)

I want to connect an ethernet shield to arduino to be able to switch on/off some lamp/fan

kg4wsv

Maker Shed just announced their PowerSwitch Tail.

I predict this will not only solve your problem, but become a fairly standard answer around here.  :)

-j

retrolefty

And not a bad price considering its 10amp rating and all the cording it comes with. However the +5vdc @ 40ma control requirements means a switching transistor should be used between the Arduino output pin and this unit.

Lefty

estranged

Has anyone used / looked at the Seeedstudio Relay Shield?

http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/relay-shield-p-641.html

For $20 seems like a decent option, about the same price as the PowerSwitch, but it has 4 outputs instead of just the one.

estranged

The "data-sheet" is a bit thin, but they do provide eagle files that has a full schematic of the board.  Its the "Source file" link at the bottom.

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