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Topic: USB connector to solder on a PCB (Read 404 times) previous topic - next topic

jtlns

Hi everyone,

I'm looking for a female USB connector to solder on a prototype PCB (2.54mm pitch). Basically I'd like to use the USB connector to power my barebone Arduino.

I have some troubles finding connectors that can be mounted on PCB. Anybody knows if the ones on the picture in attachment can be put on a PCB? (I'm worrying about the small metal legs, should they go through a hole too?)

Does anybody has some other connector suggestions? (preferable Mini USB, but I can live with "normal" USB too)

Thanks!
Jan

MarkT

Yes, you just have to enlarge a few holes if its a 0.1" pitch board.  The large metal tabs
are for strength and ideally are soldered to.  The pin spacing on a USB-A plug/socket
is quite close to 0.1"
[ I won't respond to messages, use the forum please ]

GilchristT

If you're using Eagle then there are several footprints in the SparkFun library for USB connectors that you can look at to see what's needed (and probably use, they're fairly standard).

One thing I'd advise from my own experience is that if you're also going to use the data pins on the header, USB traces are fairly sensitive to length i.e. they both need to be roughly the same length. If you're only using it for power then that doesn't affect you.

MichaelMeissner

#3
Oct 17, 2013, 03:29 pm Last Edit: Oct 17, 2013, 03:30 pm by MichaelMeissner Reason: 1
I was looking at tindie.com to see about new purchases, and I saw this, which is a micro-B female that is pre-soldered onto a small PCB breakout with 4 pins, and I remembered your query: https://www.tindie.com/products/orkwerx/micro-usb-b-socket-breakout/

The same shop also has a mini-B female and a standard-B female connector on a PCB.  I've bought other components from orkwerx at tindie (the breadboard button and the polarity stick).  I've read various complaints that micro-B usb aren't that rugged compared to the mini-B variant.

doughboy


Yes, you just have to enlarge a few holes if its a 0.1" pitch board.  The large metal tabs
are for strength and ideally are soldered to.  The pin spacing on a USB-A plug/socket
is quite close to 0.1"


this is what I did.
bend the pins so it will go in the proto board holes.
a little creativity goes a long way in working with arduino software/hardware

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