Pages: [1]   Go Down
Author Topic: Awright y'all have a looka this: Receive without arduino?  (Read 534 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Offline Offline
Newbie
*
Karma: 0
Posts: 3
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

I'm tryna find a way to set up essentially a remote switch. You basically have two parts:

Your transmitter: Controlled by the arduino (ie. pressing a button wired on the breadboard causes it to go HIGH or something of that nature) it would send out a signal for a set amount of time when that particular button is pressed.

Your receiver: on some sort of independent circuit with a lithium battery or something of that nature that, while the signal is received, would close a circuit and allow power to go through to an LED (or a buzzer or something) for the period that the signal is received. I want it to act as basically a remote switch

Now Ideally I want to have a central transmitter that'd work on several frequencies and wire it so that different buttons would would tell the arduino to tell the transmitter which ones to activate. However, having multiple transmitters which only interact with their partnered receivers would work fine.

THE PROBLEM HERE: For the most part, my team and I have only found devices that require the receiver to be connected to an arduino. That is the Xbee transmitters, the 2.4ghz transceivers, and 3.15 MHz transmitter/receiver pair, and even one of those key fob transmitters with a little receiver. ALL of those seem to require that the receiver be connected to an arduino.

Something like this looks promising: http://www.instructables.com/id/RF-315433-MHz-Transmitter-receiver-Module-and-Ardu/step4/One-Transmitter-Multi-Receiver/
But again, I think it also requires that the receiver be connected to arduino....
Is that something that is unavoidable that i need some kind of microcontroller or more than one arduino?
What dyall think? Thanks in advance
« Last Edit: October 22, 2013, 08:46:40 pm by MoMo42 » Logged

Offline Offline
God Member
*****
Karma: 17
Posts: 522
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

You pretty much need an Arduino on either end of the link, as far as I know. The Xbee (or whatever) is a digital send/receive device. You  need something on the other end to interpret the digital signal into a command such as "open relay" or whatever. The alternative would be to use something like a walkie-talkie radio pair and hook the arduino up to the "send" key and the receiver circuit up to the receiver's speaker, or something like that, such that whenever the Arduino "sent", the receiver activated the relay. But, honestly, at that point, you practically might as well just have used an Arduino.
Logged

UK
Offline Offline
Shannon Member
****
Karma: 223
Posts: 12630
-
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Firstly I think you should change the subject to give a sensible summary of your problem.

Secondly, although I can't give you a link off hand, I've seen consumer remote control systems with a key fob style transmitter that operates a set of simple on-off switches at the receiver. This seems to be the sort of thing you're looking for and I think there is a good chance that there's a product available off the shelf that does what you want.

Oh, by the way, XBee does not require an Arduino at the remote end.
Logged

I only provide help via the forum - please do not contact me for private consultancy.

Offline Offline
Newbie
*
Karma: 0
Posts: 3
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Thanks for the quick replies, i appreciate that.

To josh: Yeah, thats what we figured, but Ithink we might be able to find something

Firstly I think you should change the subject to give a sensible summary of your problem.

Secondly, although I can't give you a link off hand, I've seen consumer remote control systems with a key fob style transmitter that operates a set of simple on-off switches at the receiver. This seems to be the sort of thing you're looking for and I think there is a good chance that there's a product available off the shelf that does what you want.

Oh, by the way, XBee does not require an Arduino at the remote end.

Fix'd the title for ya.
And I think this might be what youre talking about: http://www.instructables.com/file/FI7I817HM8DG3UM Something likethat might have some potential, but all the the receivers are on the same chip, rather than being  physically seperate from one another.
Logged

UK
Offline Offline
Tesla Member
***
Karma: 124
Posts: 7129
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Would an infra-red connection work for you? If so that can be implemented very cheaply.

If your budget is a little bigger you might consider these all-in-one devices which have the transceiver and Arduino on the same board.

http://www.deltino.com/
http://lowpowerlab.com/moteino/

I am using the DelTino devices for remote control of NGauge model trains. They are very small.

...R
Logged

Offline Offline
Full Member
***
Karma: 1
Posts: 186
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Of course it's possible to receive RF and switch something without an Arduino - ask Mr Marconi! The thing is how much time and effort is it going to be for you to implement it?
Logged

UK
Offline Offline
Shannon Member
****
Karma: 223
Posts: 12630
-
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

but all the the receivers are on the same chip, rather than being  physically seperate from one another.

I don't see anything stopping you from using four separate receivers controlled by a common transmitter, and use a different channel on each receiver.
Logged

I only provide help via the forum - please do not contact me for private consultancy.

Offline Offline
Newbie
*
Karma: 0
Posts: 3
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Hrm. I’m not very experienced at all with circuitry, so thanks for your patience
Robin: I’m not really sure IR is applicable. I need the receiver to be able to detect the signal through walls, clothes, distance etc. That RFM69HW receiver from the second video on the moteino page looks very promising.
The more I read and watch videos on these moteinos, the more relevant it seems to what I’m trying to accomplish here. So… maybe I have no idea what I’m talking about, but the receiver seems to sort of mounts on the moteino. Seems like just a cheaper way to have each receiver device use a microcontroller just one cheaper than arduino.
As far as the deltino goes I’m not really sure what I’m looking at: A transceiver… does it need to be hooked up to a microcontroller or do I just get a bunch, tell one to be a transmitter and the other ones will detect signals assuming they are connected to power?
Sirch: I have about a week
PeterH: What you described there is exactly what I want to do, but I have no idea what kind of transmitter and receivers to use or where to find them. In that particular model it looks like all the receiver channel outputs are on the same chip, implying that each device connected to the receiver would have to be tethered to that particular chip that I linked above. Can you explain how that is accomplished? It’d be great if each receiver could just act as a switch and not require a microcontroller.
Logged

Offline Offline
Newbie
*
Karma: 0
Posts: 31
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Maybe this will help? Watch the video at the end of the tutorial, an arduino was not used to light up the LED on the receiver xbee's end. And the FSR can be replaced with a simple button switch perhaps?

http://examples.digi.com/sensors/feeling-force-with-an-fsr/

Maybe it's just a matter of adding more receiver xbees on the same channel to receive the same signal from the transmitting xbee.

Logged

UK
Offline Offline
Tesla Member
***
Karma: 124
Posts: 7129
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

I haven't used a Moteino, just read about them online. As far as I know they are conceptually similar to an Deltino. The device has both an Atmel 328 and a wireless transceiver on the circuit board. The Moteino uses the RFM12b wireless transceiver that works at 434MHz (I think) whereas the Deltinos use a Cypress 2.4Ghz transceiver. The Deltino's also include a motor driver H-bridge on the circuit board. (The Deltang Rx6x versions of the Deltinos are programmed to respond to regular 2.4GHz radio control transmitters).

Because the Deltinos are primarily designed to be small connecting them to a PC may be more difficult than a Moteino.

I am using one of the Deltinos connected to my PC as the "transmitter" to send commands to other identical Deltinos in my model trains which control the motors in the trains. In fact it is also possible for the trains to send data back to the PC - such as battery voltage (like a fuel gauge).

...R
Logged

Pages: [1]   Go Up
Jump to: