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Topic: Idea for micro, add USB pins (Read 672 times) previous topic - next topic

kocil

Dec 19, 2013, 04:22 am Last Edit: Dec 19, 2013, 04:41 am by kocil Reason: 1
Dear Arduino developers.
Thanks for the wonderful products.
We have been using Arduino for teaching microprocessor for more than 6 years,
using the Duemilanove and the Uno series.
Now, we are going to purchase a new batch, which is Leonardo.
However, one thing bothers us ... the USB connector is so small.
We afraid that the students will easily break it.

So we are looking at the Micro series.
We intend to put it on a larger shield, with the big USB connector there,
but alas, it is not possible, because the USB's D+ and D-
are not available in the pins.
We consulted the schematic, pin no 7 and 8 are still unconnected.
May we ask an improved version, with D+ and D- on those pins ?

Thank you very much.

Nick Gammon

I just want to warn you, the Leonardo and similar (Atmega32U4-based) devices can be a pain to program. Because the serial interface, and the processor, are on the same chip (unlike the Uno, Duemilanove etc.) you sometimes have to try two or three times to get code to upload.

Yesterday, for example I had to reboot my Mac, when it just refused to upload a sketch.

If you want the USB interface (eg. to emulate keyboards, mice etc.) then you need to use them (the 32U4 boards), but otherwise I would stick with the older boards.
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

kocil

Thanks for the warning.
Yeah, actually I prefer the older UNO one, because of the USB connector reason.
Your consideration just add another reason to stick with UNO.
But ... it will be discontinued and replaced by Leonardo, won't it ?

Nick Gammon

I hope not. It's a totally different processor.
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

Grumpy_Mike

Quote
it will be discontinued and replaced by Leonardo, won't it

No way.

Nick Gammon

Besides which, there are plenty of Uno lookalikes around (to say nothing of illegal copies). As one example:



That cost me around $15. I had to solder it together but it wasn't particularly onerous. A good starting job if you are teaching microprocessors and electronics.
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

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