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Topic: Arduino suggestions on new Arduino dev board (Read 812 times) previous topic - next topic

brolly759

Good afternoon everyone. I am currently designing a new board. At first I was going to just make the board for work and use it for something specific (Wireless iButton reader) Instead I am going to make it a dev board that others can use for there own products/projects.

What I have currently so far:

-3.3v Arduino
-FTDI
-BLE 4.0 module
-LIPO charging circuit
-1 Analog pin can monitor 3.7 v battery
-1 Digital pin to Piezo speaker
-Over/Under voltage protection
-Pushbutton turn off/on circuit
-Power LED, Charge LED
-Arduino reset switch


What else would everyone want built into the board? Some options include, temp sensor, current sensor, gyro sensor, RFID/NFC.
The board would have a clip to hold in place a lipo 3.7v 1500mah battery.


Let me know everyone's suggestions! Thanks again.

CrossRoads

Looks like you have about 10 of 20 IO pins tied up already. Better plan for some IO expansion and capability to deal with 5V circuits.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

brolly759

The only pins attached are the TX/RX lines, 1 Analog pin and 1 Digital pin right now. All the circuits (Charging circuit/push on/off circuit) are stand alone circuits that do not interface with the arduino in any way.

As for 5v, I was thinking of adding a 3.3v to 5v converter.

CrossRoads

So you're just going to have a quasi-random selection of components on a board that are not interconnected at all?
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

brolly759

The point of this is to have a board ready for production. A programmable controller that is both wireless and rechargeable. Adding a temp sensor to a pin or a speaker is dirt cheap and takes 1 pin each. If there are certain components I can attach that people could use in the everyday product, LEDs, sensors etc, the user does not need to make a custom board for there own product, rather they can use my final production board because it will have all the sensors, chips they need and then some for there application.

CrossRoads

I think you'll find instead that folks don't want to pay for stuff they will not use.
I like the approach here
http://yourduino.com/sunshop2/index.php?pg=1&l=product_list&c=5
where you connect in the what the project needs.
Not that I've done that myself, preferring to make a custom board instead, such as this 12-shift register card with Arduino functionality and off-board USB connectivity (remove USB/Serial adapter after programming, for embedded applications, like a score board)

Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

brolly759

My idea was you could have a Swiss Army knife version of an Arduino chip.  You are basically saying make it as small and modular as possible. I cannot appease anyone with this concept and just make something as small and cheap as possible.

CrossRoads

Appeasing everyone and making it as small and cheap as possible would seem to contradict each other. Unless you are doing a large quantity, the small-lot prices will hurt the unit cost, the NRE charges for pick & place assembly will hurt, the price for a solder mask will hurt, shipping to & from the assembly house will hurt. So many things to consider.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

Graynomad

Quote
adding a 3.3v to 5v converter.

Which one, the TXB series have a serious limitation, I've not tried others but I'm not convinced there is a universal option for IO pins, and if you add analogue to the mix there definitely isn't.

______
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

ralphd

Since you're going to have an FTDI chip, I'd suggest connecting it to the SPI lines in addition to the Tx/Rx so you could use it as a programmer (FTDI bitbang) and avoid having a bootloader on the chip.
Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth - Einstein.

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