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Topic: Normal English phrase embarrassing in the US (Read 6158 times) previous topic - next topic

Grumpy_Mike

My son, who has been sent to Huston this week by his work, has this to report:-

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if you do happen to go to America, and you are in a room and want to tell someone that you are going to leave, try and avoid saying "I have to shoot off"!

Jantje

I know what "shoot off" means in English but why is it embarrassing in the US?

Best regards
Jantje
Do not PM me a question unless you are prepared to pay for consultancy.
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Grumpy_Mike

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why is it embarrassing in the US

Something about masturbation.

Jantje

Do not PM me a question unless you are prepared to pay for consultancy.
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AWOL

Also, if you need to remove pencil marks on a page, don't ask for a rubber.
"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.

el_supremo

It is also wise to avoid saying "Don't knock me up at 6am" when in mixed company.

Pete

Coding Badly

#6
Mar 14, 2014, 02:00 am Last Edit: Mar 14, 2014, 02:06 am by Coding Badly Reason: 1
My son, who has been sent to Huston this week by his work...


My sympathies.  I am so glad I no longer live there.

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if you do happen to go to America, and you are in a room and want to tell someone that you are going to leave, try and avoid saying "I have to shoot off"!


XD

Never use "pop" or "soda".  The correct word is "coke".  A mixed container of cold beverages uses the plural form, "cokes".  As in, the "cokes is over there."

If he prefers iced tea sans sugar he must specifically request "unsweetened tea".

"Fixin-to" = "planning" or "going to".

Mind the personal space.

Jack Christensen

Remember: Y'all is singular. All y'all is plural. All y'all's is plural possessive.

--Kinky Friedman

MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

Coding Badly


Oh, the quintessential water tower complete with city name.  In case we forget where we live.

flyboy

Yes, in Texas, the word is Coke.  I've lived in Indiana, Texas, and Arkansas.  You can use just about any word you want, Coke, Soda, or Pop.  People may look at you a little strange, but they get the idea of what you're saying.

CrossRoads

Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

tmd3

#11
Mar 16, 2014, 04:43 am Last Edit: Mar 16, 2014, 04:50 am by tmd3 Reason: 1
All y'all are having a lot of fun at Houston's expense.  Since I live in Houston, I feel compelled to defend it.  However, most of what you're saying is true-ish, if not true outright.

... try and avoid saying "I have to shoot off"!
With a reasonable audience, you can get away with it - indeed, you can get away with almost anything - if you say it with a British accent.  Teenagers and young men who don't date much will probably ridicule you for it, no matter what your accent.  Unless you're from Yorkshire, in which case no one will understand you at all.

Never use "pop" or "soda".
I live in Houston now, and I can't remember the last time I heard generic soft drinks called "cokes."  It's a ferocious melting pot here, and things change fast.  I say "soda," and always get away with it.  Out in the hinterland, though, everything seems to be a coke.

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If he prefers iced tea sans sugar he must specifically request "unsweetened tea".
Yes, he must.  The default state of iced tea is sweetened.  In the broad swath of the south, an especially sweetened tea has come into use, made by saturating it with sugar while it's hot; that's called, "sweet tea," and you generally have to ask for it specifically.  It the server asks you, "Sweet tea?" and you decline, you'll probably get sweetened tea.  

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"Fixin-to" = "planning" or "going to".
"Fixin' to" is used by the speaker to explain why he's idle at the moment.  "Whatchoo doin' up there on the porch with that mint julep, Buford?"  "I'm fixin' to go out back and dig me some post holes."  Post-hole digging is a lot of work, so it sounds like the speaker is very busy, while fixin' to dig post holes is kind of relaxing, and may involve whiskey or beer.

... don't ask for a rubber.
Indeed.  Even an upperclass London accent won't help you with that one.  Especially, don't send your young daughter into the drugstore to ask for them.

Y'all is singular ...
Yeah, sort of.  In my experience, the expected form of address - "you," "y'all," or "all y'all," - depends on the angle that the listeners occupy, from the speakers viewpoint.  Narrow angle, "you;" up to about 90 degrees, "y'all;" more than that "all y'all."


TomGeorge

Normal US phrase embarrassing in Australia.

Hi, and in Australia we barrack for our footballs team, not   root.
Has more than just a meaning of a trees appendages.

Tom....
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running......VK3DMK

AWOL

"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.

Grumpy_Mike

I understand that in Australia the word Sellotape is the name of a condom, where as in the UK this is the generic word for adhesive tape or scotch tape in the US.

In the UK barrack is exactly the opposite it means to noisily show disapproval.

In the US they seem to do this to their president as they always Barrack Obarma

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