Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
Author Topic: Stronger CPU options.  (Read 1724 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
0
Offline Offline
Newbie
*
Karma: 0
Posts: 1
Arduino rocks
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

There are much more powerful CPUs that Atmel makes, including such beasties as the ATmega1281 series. For the surface-mount Arduino BT, the difference in prices on Digi-Key between the ATmega168 and the ATmega1281 are basically $0.61. (Granted, it looks like you have to buy quantities in the 100s to order the DIP packaging, but still.)

Not that I'm saying the Arduinos are crap: far from it. I'm *loving* messing around with them. I'm learning all kinds of stuff and the Arduinos have inspired me to pick up a set of devkits from Atmel.

Still, it was pretty funny when I learned that the onboard processor for the WT11 on the Arduino BT were more powerful, with more flash RAM, than the Atmel controller on them. :-)

Love all the devices regardless folks. :-) Cool stuff.
Logged

0
Offline Offline
God Member
*****
Karma: 0
Posts: 731
skcor oniudrA
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Quote
Not that I'm saying the Arduinos are crap: far from it.

Very far from it, in fact, so far from it I think this is the first time I've ever seen the words "crap" and "arduino" in the same sentence.

I went through a lot of micro's before finding Arduino, I have a stack of them gathering dust in the office.

Arduino's something people start with, from receipt of Arduino, installation of the IDE and programming a LED sequence, can be done in well under an hour by a complete newbie.

Once people have max'd out their Arduino's, then some go on to build shields or create variations of Arduino to expand its capabilities.

So its important to understand the product life cycle before drawing any conclusions about the Arduino based on its obvious specifications, its a great device, and some people go on to make fortunes because of what the Arduino has given them the ability to accomplish without the need to fund impossibly expensive custom controller solutions.

The power of Arduino is in the programs people create for it to execute, and because of the IDE's ease of use, its potential is limited only by the imagination of ordinary folk, so its shelf life is practically indefinable. And thats not something many micro's can boast.
Logged

SF Bay Area (USA)
Offline Offline
Tesla Member
***
Karma: 124
Posts: 6654
Strongly opinionated, but not official!
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Quote
the ATmega1281 series. For the surface-mount Arduino BT, the difference in prices on Digi-Key between the ATmega168 and the ATmega1281 are basically $0.61. (Granted, it looks like you have to buy quantities in the 100s to order the DIP packaging, but still.)
Huh?  The 1281 is about $9.50 (100s at digikey), compared to $2.39 for 168.  And the 1281 doesn't seem to have a DIP package.  Were you looking at some other chip?
Logged

Forum Administrator
Cambridge, MA
Offline Offline
Faraday Member
*****
Karma: 11
Posts: 3538
View Profile
WWW
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

We're working on a board based on the ATmega1280.  It should be ready in the next couple of months.
Logged

0
Offline Offline
Jr. Member
**
Karma: 0
Posts: 62
Arduino rocks / OpenLCB rocks
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Can you clarify?  The 1280 and 1281 are 64 and 100 pin surface mount chips.  Do you mean the ATMega 128?

David
« Last Edit: August 22, 2008, 10:56:31 am by dpharris » Logged

Dr. David Harris
OpenLCB Dev Team

0
Offline Offline
God Member
*****
Karma: 2
Posts: 854
Arduino rocks!
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

I don't see a 1280 in DIP, but there's no reason Arduino's bigger brother has to use a DIP MCU.  The whole board can be used as a controller easily enough, so I don't see why the Arduino team should limit themselves that way.  

Logged

Dyess AFB, Tx
Offline Offline
Newbie
*
Karma: 0
Posts: 48
Arduino rocks
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

you want a big brother, check out http://sanguino.cc

I bought 2
« Last Edit: August 22, 2008, 11:30:13 am by Quijonsith » Logged

0
Offline Offline
God Member
*****
Karma: 2
Posts: 854
Arduino rocks!
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

sanguino does look pretty nice, I've been keeping it in mind.  The part that impressed me is that it seems fully compatible with the Arduino software, just with the IO lines going higher.  

A 1280 based board could easily have 60 IO lines and will have much more memory than the sanguino.
Logged

Dyess AFB, Tx
Offline Offline
Newbie
*
Karma: 0
Posts: 48
Arduino rocks
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

i haven't done any of my own code yet on my sanguinos, but i did upload some test sketches it came with under "examples:sanguino-testers", works perfectly out of the box.  
Logged

USA
Offline Offline
Sr. Member
****
Karma: 0
Posts: 452
Freeduino rocks
View Profile
WWW
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Quote
Can you clarify?  The 1280 and 1281 are 64 and 100 pin surface mount chips.  Do you mean the ATMega 128?

David
The ATMEGA128 is also a surface mount chip.  If you look at the most recent developments, all of them are based on SMD chips.  To avoid whole development board replacements in case of fried atmegas, the only option is to separate the whole system in smaller boards... FTDI in one board (you can use ethernet, bluetooth, xbee, etc) and name it the communication board, and then the atmega with the headers in another board named the main board.  In case of failure, you can just replace the main board.
Logged

PoA - RS - Brasil
Offline Offline
Newbie
*
Karma: 0
Posts: 27
-protect-
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

or just use one of those smd2dip adapters...
Logged


0
Offline Offline
Newbie
*
Karma: 0
Posts: 44
Arduino rocks
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Quote
or just use one of those smd2dip adapters...
Have you seen a 100 pin DIP package lately? Well, ever for that matter! So you do a break-out board, like http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=36 which takes up most of the Arduino board area! And you still have to put some pin strips, say $3 worth on it, oh, and you have to get the ATmega128/1280 or whatever onto the board.

Of course there are many ways to remove SMD devices, and soldering them isn't difficult - this: http://chipquik.com/store/prod_smd1.htm is one way to get the chips off.

The simple reality is this, if we want newer chips we are going to have to go to SMD packages. Basic 'duinos using things like the ATmega168, ATmega328P and the Sanquino using the ATmega644P will serve one market segment. Other users will want bigger engines and they will need to be happy using TQFP and the likes.

But then I would also ask, if you take a little care in handling your chips and interfacing, how many chips do you "fritz" anyway? I only get dead chips when I put them in backwards, and I have even done that with SMTs. Apart from that? I cannot remember the last one.

The Geek
Logged

Dyess AFB, Tx
Offline Offline
Newbie
*
Karma: 0
Posts: 48
Arduino rocks
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Quote
sanguino does look pretty nice, I've been keeping it in mind.  The part that impressed me is that it seems fully compatible with the Arduino software, just with the IO lines going higher.  

A 1280 based board could easily have 60 IO lines and will have much more memory than the sanguino.

Update on my sanguinos.  I've started experimenting with my own code now.  Once you setup the core per the website's instructions the arduino code is the same as you said.  digitalWrite(0, low) writes a low to digital pin 0.  One difference though is if you use direct port access such as "PORTB = PORTB | 1" you'll want to check the datasheet.  The port registers, etc, don't map to the same pins as the ATMEGA168.
Logged

Paris, France
Offline Offline
Newbie
*
Karma: 0
Posts: 4
Arduino rocks
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

mellis wrote:
Quote
We're working on a board based on the ATmega1280.  It should be ready in the next couple of months.
Hi,
I'm working with Meshnetics's Zigbit and want to port the Arduino software to the atmega1281 that's in it. How should I do ? From what I understand, I basically have to remap the pins from the cores/ directory, but some directions would be appreciated.
The result could be a Arduino mini with 802.15.4 and/or zigbee support in a real small package, for less than $25.

Regards,
Charles
(yes, I'm new to the forum, and yes, I will introduce myself later)
Logged

0
Offline Offline
Sr. Member
****
Karma: 0
Posts: 430
Arduino rocks
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Is there an AVR32 *duino in development?

smiley
Logged

Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
Jump to: