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Topic: hi have you tried gogoboard (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

karan chaphekar

Hi i am karan from india

Please see this robot controller called gogoboard from MIT
its open source and uses THE EASIEST LANGUAGE to program in

Its great for children. It is also good with dc motor

Please reply

Mike Mc


karan chaphekar

http://www.gogoboard.org/cocoon/gogosite/home.xsp?lang=en

now cheak out

Mike Mc

Looks OK if a bit old fashioned. I see no advantage in it over an Arduino.

karan chaphekar

it got inbuilt motor drivers and just check the language from cricket's site (handyboard)

gbulmer

#5
Aug 22, 2009, 10:18 pm Last Edit: Aug 23, 2009, 10:50 am by gbulmer Reason: 1
If you can wait a few months, there will be new board, based on Arduino that works with an enhanced Scratch. The board has the usual Scratch sensors (light, sound, slider, button), jack sockets for plug-in sensors, DC and stepper motor driver (L293D), servo support (headers with polyfuse protection), 6 LEDs and Infrared RC receiver.

I'm sorry it isn't ready yet.

GB

(Edited)

jezuz

OMG H-bridges built in!!! I am sooooo getting one!

No, but seriously, looks alright, no reason to migrate to it though once your a familiar arduino user.

sciguy

How does this relate to Arduino in the Arduino forums?
Soundcloud page: http://soundcloud.com/beefinator-2
Youtube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/beefinator14
Old soundcloud page (ran out o

gbulmer

Quote
How does this relate to Arduino in the Arduino forums?

Maybe I am misunderstanding the question.

The original post seems to me to be very appropriate in this "... Suggestions" area.

Did you follow the URL and read the page?

Can you explain what it is your trying to ask? What are you trying to understand?

GB

Miguel Angel

Hola, no se electrónica pero ensamble una gogoboard. Ahora tengo una Arduino y quiero conectar motores CD de un carrito de control remoto. Encontré que se usa un "Puente H", y este circuito está en el L293D que usa la gogoboard, pero no se como conectar los motores y como conectar el L293D fuera de la gogoboard. La gogoboard tiene la posiblidad tanto de servomotores como de motores CD.

Traducción en línea
Translation on line
Hello, not electronic but assemble a gogoboard. Now I have an Arduino and want to connect engines CD of a cart of remote control. I thought that there is used a " Bridge H ", and this circuit is in the L293D that the gogoboard uses, but not as the engines connect and as the L293D connects out of the gogoboard. The gogoboard has the posiblidad so much of servomotors as of motive CD.


 


Osgeld

#10
Aug 28, 2010, 08:49 am Last Edit: Aug 28, 2010, 08:50 am by Osgeld Reason: 1
Quote
it got inbuilt motor drivers


I have been using MCU's for nearly 6 years now, and have just now come up with a project that requires a motor, which is hitting the crap bin cause I do not wish to deal with the timing of it

(high speed + sync = bleh on  a 4 hour ohh aww news article for me)
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

gbulmer

#11
Aug 28, 2010, 01:34 pm Last Edit: Aug 28, 2010, 01:37 pm by gbulmer Reason: 1
Quote
I have been using MCU's for nearly 6 years now, and have just now come up with a project that requires a motor, which is hitting the crap bin cause I do not wish to deal with the timing of it


Depends what ones aims are.

After I'd done the usual LEDs and squeaky-speaker stuff, a friend and I made a simple remotely operated vehicle (what some folks might call a robot), controlled by an Arduino and a L293D motor driver, with a couple of DC motors. It had a wired remote control with switches built on a breadboard. The 6 year old it was built for was absolutely delighted. It opened his eyes to the possibility of making your own toys. It opened my eyes to the value of teaching children as young as 6 programming (we were impressed that he spotted logic errors while he worked with my friend, his granddad, on Arduino programs).

The SenseBoard I designed last year is an Arduino, but with various pieces of electronics built into the board. The goal is to give Scratch users several engaging physical interfaces and functionality to make programming more challenging, relevant and interesting.

I run Arduino workshops for children and adults, and I find that motors are popular because they move. Some folks get very interested in the possibility of making a genuinely autonomous machine. Using the SenseBoard, a 6 year old might make and program their own tethered robot, using Scratch. It might drive around like a vehicle, or sort candies into different coloured piles. Whatever captures their imagination seems good to me.

More recently, a teenager who comes along to my after-school club where we use Arduino's, built his own robot 'mice'. He had never programmed before doing some Arduino workshops. He says that he had wanted to make some form of robot, so when we did motor control and how to use sensors, he was inspired. He won one of the UK National Micromouse competitions earlier this year using the knowledge of how to drive motors, and use an Arduino. He built and programmed the robot himself using an off-the-shelf Freeduino Nano.

I think the beauty of microcontrollers, and the Arduino in particular, is the enormous range of possibilities. Making the learning curve for some of those possibilities gentle and stimulating is the goal of things like the GOGO board, and the SenseBoard.

HTH - GB

Osgeld

I understand all of that, but the point was "why dont you use this product" cause it has stuff built in that I will not need most of the time, thus limiting its market

http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

gbulmer

#13
Aug 28, 2010, 10:50 pm Last Edit: Aug 28, 2010, 10:58 pm by gbulmer Reason: 1
Quote
I understand all of that, but the point was "why dont you use this product" cause it has stuff built in that I will not need most of the time, thus limiting its market


I think Scratch physical computing boards 'fit' a different group of people, or market, from the Arduino. I think rather than limit their market, having a range of understandably useful stuff on board reduces the obstacles for folks to get started using them; they are just different things. GOGOboard or SenseBoard might even help a different group of folks (from Arduino users) get started, and move towards devices like the Arduino (though that is beside the point).

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