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Topic: Larger Arduino projects (Read 5153 times) previous topic - next topic

nkcelectronics

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Actually, now I'm wondering, what does the nunchuck do about it? Since people plug them right in, don' they?


Now that's an excellent question.  My guess would be that the ASIC in the nunchuck does some level conversion.

The nunchuk doesnt have a LIS302DL.  I think it is a LIS3something and it is probably 5V.  The LIS302DL has on chip i2c.

nkcelectronics

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There are a lot of interesting devices out there that use the i2c interface (the new Wiznet 5300 chip

Unless I am completely misreading the W5300 product page the 5300 doesn't have SPI let alone I2C. The 5100 has SPI but no I2C.

--Phil.

Sorry, i2c was used on the W3100.

John_Ryan

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Wow, lots of energy here!

We love to see people developing products and standards around Arduino: it might help sell Arduino boards, but it also greatly increases the choices available to the community, which is more important.  And, of course, we love to see other people building on and benefitting from our work; that's one of the main reasons it's an open-source project.

A standard around I2C shields would be wonderful.  Does someone want to open a thread in the hardware development forum to start hashing it out?  The Arduino team would be happy to help create and support it.  

We're also always interested in adding new products to Arduino - and, of course, sharing the profits from those products with their creators.  We try to balance that with the desire to keep the core line small, so that beginners have an easy time getting started.  If you have an idea, we'd love to hear about it and see if it makes sense to include - if not, we're happy to see it developed independently.  If money is ever a problem, I'm sure we can find a way to help.

As for coordinating and discussing development: you're welcome to use the forums (e.g. the ones on hardware and software development), the playground (which is publicly editable), and the developers mailing list for discussion and coordination.  I also just created an Arduino playground project on Google Code that includes a Subversion repository.  I'd like it to be publicly editable in the same way as the playground wiki, but I don't think Google Code supports that - so if you want access, just post your Google account username and I'll add you.  We could set up more infrastructure, but I think we can accomplish a lot with a wiki, a forum, a mailing list, and a version control repository.  If you've got other ideas, please throw them out there.

Again, it's great to see this kind of discussion, and I'm happy to do what I can to help.  


That's a very positive sentiment Mellis, I'm sure everyone appreciates it in addition to the fine work you do already.

If Arduino added a shopping cart to it's site, that provided for multiple merchants allowing each to log-in and configure their own product, shipping costs and current inventories, then everyone could sell their products from the one location - including the guys from tinker.it

That way, anyone interested in buying Arduino/related products would have the one handy location to do all their shopping - and the sellers providing product and support, would never be too far away because they're all members at the forum.

At the moment, there are tiny e-commerce sites scattered all over the web selling Arduino/related product. It must be very confusing to new people trying to figure out their options. So if they can buy a whole bunch of product from one location, regardless of the location it's distributed from, then they might be inclined to buy more in a single transaction.





follower

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Sorry, i2c was used on the W3100.

Hmmm, interesting, I never knew that--I'd hate to think what the throughput was like!

--Phil.

bwevans

Im a little late to this but I would like throw in a little.

First I really like the idea of a small accelerometer board with the same format as the blink-m. Using the sparkfun example there is absolutely no reason why these couldnt be produced for around $20 or so depending on whether the levels need to be shifted or not and what extra hardware is needed. (I also agree hacking the nunchuck is just in-elegant and wasteful.) The surface mount is simply not a problem when you manufacture boards yourself using the famed laser stencil/skillet method which is how every single board sparkfun sells in made. This method is simple and fast for reasonable sized batches of boards. Ive been too insanely occupied recently but I hope to introduce a new project that will use this fabrication method within the next couple of months.

Anyway, I am very much the hardware guy and if you need someone to manufacture something like this I might be able to help. But what would really make something like this shine is the supporting libraries also like the blink-m. And here I think is also a rub with the open hardware movt... not only do you have to get a bunch of folks to agree on the same tenants of hardware design, there's got to be those folks who will also get the software to work too. So, if there is enough interest in a 3axis uShield maybe that should be spun off as another topic for discussion and collaboration.

As I was thinking about this, a never ending string of stacking uShields could get a little tricky amp wise. Please correct me if Im wrong, but the blink-m uses two of the arduino (analog) pins as source for 5v and ground. This will only be good for 40mA correct? Stacking them is an open invite for some dead i/o pins if you ask me. Much beter to have the convenience of sticking on a little piece of kit that gives some functionality (such as a bad ass blinky light *OR* 3axis sensor, etc) and when you need the kitchen sink you can whip up the breadboard with the appropriate wiring. The trade off of convenience versus full functionality rather than trying to be the be all end all.

Finally, I would just like to say that I ABSOLUTELY love the chaos that happens with the Free/Arduino development. Its like a scene from the Smurfs, where the sun is out, the grass is green, and the butterflies lazily fly by when you are first introduced to this cute little blue guy that promises fully web enabled wine racks or blenders that speak to their owners. Then you pull back the curtains just a little bit and theres all this stuff being made, developed, proposed, and so on. Its like going to your first punk show in the 80s and having the biggest WTF moment of your life. Tod had been talking about 'smart leds' for a couple years and then one day out of the blue (to most of us) the happy arduino has a new blinky friend. Yeah its of lot of work and we all have our reasons for doing it but this chaotic development is downright fun if you ask me. Sure there could be more coalescing amongst some of us as we develop new things but I am very happy with this convoluted, prismatic, and even sometimes problematic landscape that has sprouted up around this platform. And that to me is an advantage of the open hardware movement and I applaud the foundation for their work and foresight to allow that to happen as well as the indie makers that in part made things happen anyway.

Cheers,
Brian

spiffed

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As I was thinking about this, a never ending string of stacking uShields could get a little tricky amp wise. Please correct me if Im wrong, but the blink-m uses two of the arduino (analog) pins as source for 5v and ground. This will only be good for 40mA correct? Stacking them is an open invite for some dead i/o pins if you ask me. Much beter to have the convenience of sticking on a little piece of kit that gives some functionality (such as a bad ass blinky light *OR* 3axis sensor, etc) and when you need the kitchen sink you can whip up the breadboard with the appropriate wiring. The trade off of convenience versus full functionality rather than trying to be the be all end all.


This is where the ushield shield comes into play. It provides the power from the comparatively beefy 5V line to a number of little 4 pin sockets.
iDuino - MaxSerial - [url=http://spi

spiffed

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Finally, I would just like to say that I ABSOLUTELY love the chaos that happens with the Free/Arduino development. Its like a scene from the Smurfs, where the sun is out, the grass is green, and the butterflies lazily fly by when you are first introduced to this cute little blue guy that promises fully web enabled wine racks or blenders that speak to their owners. Then you pull back the curtains just a little bit and theres all this stuff being made, developed, proposed, and so on. Its like going to your first punk show in the 80s and having the biggest WTF moment of your life. Tod had been talking about 'smart leds' for a couple years and then one day out of the blue (to most of us) the happy arduino has a new blinky friend. Yeah its of lot of work and we all have our reasons for doing it but this chaotic development is downright fun if you ask me. Sure there could be more coalescing amongst some of us as we develop new things but I am very happy with this convoluted, prismatic, and even sometimes problematic landscape that has sprouted up around this platform. And that to me is an advantage of the open hardware movement and I applaud the foundation for their work and foresight to allow that to happen as well as the indie makers that in part made things happen anyway.


"Then you pull back the curtains just a little bit and theres all this stuff being made..." This, I believe, is where the topic started in the first place, as a way to say "hey, I've thought of this amazing idea, and hey, it kinda works, but I could use some help". At what level you need help is I guess up to every individual. "I've had a great idea", "this is how it will work", "it sorta works", "it works but I only have one", "I have 300 how can I show them off and sell them", to "I had 300 and then I sold them how can I help someone else now" are all places where people can fall off the development wagon, and I think the original point was to find a way to help connect people at every rung.

i think a great discussion on "bigger things" has been sidetracked by the idea of one particular thing (the i2c ushield etc).
iDuino - MaxSerial - [url=http://spi

Oracle

This thread did get off track from my original desire to start a system to foster the development of larger and more complicated multi-person projects.

I do love the uShield idea and I'd love to help it continue.  But I still want to see a way to encourage wider development.

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