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Topic: Arduino: Good for prototype...but production? (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

dsengere

Hi All. I am relatively new to the whole micro-controller world, so please bear with my ignorance!  :smiley-mr-green: I wish to plump the deep well of your knowledge.

I have been using Arduino as a prototyping micro-controller with Simulink, and I really enjoy the easy interface. But I know that it's not at all practical to crank out arduinos in a production scenario.   =(

Arduino is great for prototyping and learning. But most "real-world" applications (that is, beyond hobby and education) require a cost-effective, mass-producible solution.

That  being said, what platforms/methods/approaches are good for transitioning a prototype design into a production-intent design? I think it would suck to have to rip up the design and start from scratch. That's why I really like that Simulink supports code generation for tons of platforms, including the Arduino. Maybe I've answered my own question- using Simulink as a design platform is convenient as it allows you to take your model to many platforms. I suppose being proficient in C-code could be equally as helpful as many platforms accept C code and can compile it into assembly code, etc. 

Am I on target here, or way out in left field?

Any insight would be greatly appreciated!

Grumpy_Mike

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But most "real-world" applications (that is, beyond hobby and education) require a cost-effective, mass-producible solution.

So look up "stand alone arduino" and just build the bits you want of an arduino  into your device.

Chagrin

Take a look at this article and you'll find he makes some pretty convincing arguments why a complete Uno made sense for his production machine.

http://paulfurley.com/arduino-isnt-just-for-hackers/

If you bought this machine and needed to repair it or wanted to adjust its operation wouldn't you agree that it would be a pretty nice sight to see that there were off-the-shelf Unos sitting inside it?

jbarchuk


http://paulfurley.com/arduino-isnt-just-for-hackers/

If you bought this machine and needed to repair it or wanted to adjust its operation wouldn't you agree that it would be a pretty nice sight to see that there were off-the-shelf Unos sitting inside it?


Back in the day... I worked at a mil grade electronics manufacturer. There was a department named hybrids, which used pick-n-place machines to make tiny modules in the 2x2" range, in metal cans, with ceramic substrates to carry the circuit traces, raw IC dies, plus a few discrete parts mounted on them, then hermetically welded-sealed shut. One day the needed me to open up the pick-n-placer and make some modifications. Inside I found, now get this, a Commodore C-64. Not kidding. I knew what it was because I had one myself and had opened the case may times to mess around inside. The Commodore name and 'C=64' logos were clearly printed on it. THEN I noticed WOW - the KEYBOARD had a 'C=' key!!!! Short answer, there's no reason to design and build something that's readily available off the shelf for a very reasonable price.

jbarchuk

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Arduino is great for prototyping and learning. But most "real-world" applications (that is, beyond hobby and education) require a cost-effective, mass-producible solution.


Meaning that Atmel designs and produces chips primarily for the hobby/educational worlds? I'm sure that -either- they'll be entirely surprised to hear that, -or- you're misinformed.  :P

For anything that's designed specifically for the typical line of Arduio-Atmel chips, then to make a 'shrunk' version of an Arduino-prototyped design, there is near-ZERO 'redesign' of anything.

For a product that 'a' particular Uc or series of Ucs proves to be unsuitable, then that's a different issue, that a different family/manufacturer should have been PICked in the first place. (Pun intended. :))

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That's why I really like that Simulink supports code generation for tons of platforms, including the Arduino.


That's generally not how product design works, that 'a design' needs to be produced on 'tons of platforms.' A design 'starts at the beginning and the end,' with the input, processing, and output requirements. That involves dozens to hundreds of specs. Once that's defined then the choice of tons of platforms -usually- narrows the field to only a few, and then one part.

The -Arduino- line of boards -IS- targeted towards the educational/hobby world. For that particular line of chips a pro could use an appropriate Arduino board, if one is suitable. Or would buy another Atmel engineering development board, or other 3rd party development board, or build one from scratch pretty quickly. The shortest easiest path from   ;) to  $) is an engineering topic, not an Arduino-vs-anything else topic.

dsengere

Thanks everybody, I appreciate the help!  ]:D

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