Go Down

Topic: DUE Vin voltage (Read 7037 times) previous topic - next topic

zenseidk

Hello,

I have a DUE board and I want to power it with a 9V powersupply, which connects to a 5V regulator curcuit, which again connects through the Vin pin on the board. The board is built into a box and does now allow direct connection of the 9V powersupply.

Can I use 5V on the Vin pin or is that also a 3,3 V maximum?

zaxarias


Hello,

I have a DUE board and I want to power it with a 9V powersupply, which connects to a 5V regulator curcuit, which again connects through the Vin pin on the board. The board is built into a box and does now allow direct connection of the 9V powersupply.

Can I use 5V on the Vin pin or is that also a 3,3 V maximum?


VIN. The input voltage to the Arduino board when it's using an external power source (as opposed to 5 volts from the USB connection or other regulated power source). You can supply voltage through this pin, or if supplying voltage via the power jack, access it through this pin.
5V. This pin outputs a regulated 5V from the regulator on the board. The board can be supplied with power either from the DC power jack (7 - 12V), the USB connector (5V), or the VIN pin of the board (7-12V). Supplying voltage via the 5V or 3.3V pins bypasses the regulator, and can damage your board. We don't advise it.

As you see it's clear that you can supply your Due using 7-12 when using Vin.
http://arduino.cc/en/Main/arduinoBoardDue
z.p

zenseidk

Hi,

I actually read that right before making this post and I didn't catch what you highlighted... Thanks for pointing it out!

zaxarias


Hi,

I actually read that right before making this post and I didn't catch what you highlighted... Thanks for pointing it out!

you're welcome  8) 8)
z.p

jlsilicon

#4
Nov 30, 2017, 04:01 pm Last Edit: Nov 30, 2017, 04:17 pm by jlsilicon
Quick Info Update FYI :

Testing from another Site :

Arduino DUE Power Consumption:

at 7V Supply:
Full Load:    94mA
NOP:       92mA
Sleep:       70mA
Backup Mode:    21mA


at 9V Supply:
Full Load:    74mA
NOP:       72mA
Sleep:       55mA
Backup Mode:    18mA

at 12V Supply:
Full Load:    55mA
NOP:       55mA
Sleep:       40mA
Backup Mode:    14mA

-> So, a 9V Battery (at 300-450mAh with ~80mA Load) might last from 4-6 hours in FullLoad mode or 16-25 hours in Backup mode.
  - not bad compared to UNO at 45mA drain - making DUE about half the UNO Hours

- from :
https://electronza.com/power-guzzlers-testing-arduino-boards/

promacjoe2

Actually, you can supply power to the Arduino, Through the 5V pin. It is basically the same as supplying 5V power through the USB port with the exception of the MOSFET that acts as a diode. It is not normally recommended because of the chance of getting the polarity backwards. Care must be taken connecting power in this manner. If you get the polarity correct no harm will come to your Arduino. In fact some manufacturers , provide 5 V power for a 7" TFT display adapter, and the Arduino, Through the 5V pin. You can only harm your Arduino if you reversed the polarity, or apply too much voltage to the unit.

Be careful.

Go Up