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Topic: Arduino network possible?? (Read 2092 times) previous topic - next topic

trashman

hi all -

wanted to check this out before i got into the Arduino scene:

is it possible to setup multiple arduino boards in a simple network using, say, a USB hub? or perhaps an i2c network?  or even over wifi or bluetooth. and if so, is it possible to somehow give each board in the network a unique id or address, so that i can send different commands to each from a host PC? as opposed to having multiple arduinos mimicing each other...

i am wanting to control multiple motors from, in different locations (several feet apart) all from one pc.

anyone have any info on this?

thanks!
-josh


mellis

You could try the I2C (Wire) library that comes with Wiring - it should also run with the ATmega8 on the Arduino board, though I haven't tried it.  If you get it working, let us know.

Documentation here: http://wiring.org.co/reference/libraries/Wire/index.html
Library here: http://arduino.cc/files/Wiring-07-Wire.zip

Westbam

Quote

wanted to check this out before i got into the Arduino scene:


I am in the same situation, so wondered if anyone had any luck, before I order 10 boards I wanne hook up in a big instalation.

Reading what teh arduino can do, I must say, prety impressed.

fallen

I think we can't use I2C (Wire) library directly , the I2C in Wiring use pin0 and pin1 , but in Arduino , I2C at analog 5(SCL) and analog 4(SDA) , but we can't use these two pin .

fallen

If we can change Arduino's hardware serial port from 8 bit data to 9 bit data , we can build a Arduino network, but it need to modify the lib of Arduino, I don't know how to do it , who can give me some tutorials ?

mellis

You can modify the Arduino libraries by editing the files in ARDUINO/lib/targets/arduino.  These are recompiled each time your sketch is.  See http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/BuildProcess for more about how this works.  For documentation on the standard AVR library (libc) used by Arduino, see http://www.nongnu.org/avr-libc/user-manual/modules.html.  

fallen

Hi ! I found "serial.databits=8" in "preferences.txt" . I want to make sure that this "databit" use for bootloader or use for my  programme ?

and I can't find any other "databits" in ARDUINO/lib/targets/arduino , could you tell me where to find the "databit" use for my  programme? thank you !

MartinFick

Just trying to see if anyone had any success with networking since this thread died 2 years ago?

kg4wsv

Look at recent threads on I2C networking (e.g. "aurduino dual core").

A blatantly obvious way to network Arduinos is with the new Ethernet shield.

-j


drone

i2c works great.  You can easily extend range of i2c network using i2c buffers, otherwise, I've got 10' over a high-end serial cable working just fine w/ only pull-ups on the slaves.

!c

Celso Fraga

Why don't just use the good old RS-485? I've been sucessfully using that... Easy and cheap...
www.arduinors.net

MartinFick

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Why don't just use the good old RS-485? I've been sucessfully using that... Easy and cheap...
Is there an arduino networking stack that uses 485?  I was hoping for a full fledged solution.  Perhaps I need to look into the LEDuino.

Quote
Look at recent threads on I2C networking (e.g. "aurduino dual core").
I searched for both of those threads and could not find them.   Could you help me out out and point to them specifically, perhaps they need some other keyword to find them?

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A blatantly obvious way to network Arduinos is with the new Ethernet shield.
Yes, thanks.  I would however like to have a simple lighterweight solution that hopefully uses already onboard hardware.  The ethernet shield seems to cost more than the arduino!

John_Ryan

Dual core Arduino, or dcore, is a proof of concept project with 2 ATMEGA168's sharing a single resonator and joined by i2c connector pins A4 and A5.

The main purpose of the project was to add a second serial buffer and exchange data between 2 ICs over i2c. The single resonator isn't necessary, both ICs can be completely independent, like 2 NG boards can do the same thing = )

I'd recommend doing some research on i2c and decide if that protocol is suitable for your requirements. The main advantage is Arduino can do i2c "out-of-the-box" using the wire library.

http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1205243372


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