Go Down

Topic: LPC810 mini ARM Prozessor in 8 pin dip package (Read 16562 times) previous topic - next topic

graynomad

I use the LPC Xpresso IDE, I gather that's based on Eclipse so maybe EGit will work with it.

______
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

ChrisMicro

>I use the LPC Xpresso IDE

Hmm... I think that could work.
Using the LPC-Project is very simple. First you have to install EGit.

RightClick on the projects-explorer-window
-> import -> Git -> Projects from Git -> "Clone Button" on the right site
Than you can place

https://github.com/bobc/OpenLasp

in the URI-Field. Than Eclipse should be able to download the repo.

Better is if you fork the project first in Git to your on GitHub account.

There is a simple Tutorial for EGit:
http://eclipsesource.com/blogs/tutorials/egit-tutorial/

ChrisMicro

Hi Bob,

I tried to install OpenLasp like you described it:

Installation procedure:

    Copy the Arduino/hardware folder to your sketches folder
    Copy the OpenLaspExamples folder to your sketches folder
    Restart Arduino IDE

But it didn't work as expected.
Instead I had to do the following:

copy
/OpenLasp/Arduino/hardware/OpenLasp/LPC8
to
/arduino-1.5.7/hardware/arduino/LPC8



ChrisMicro

Now the programmer file is missing:
java.io.IOException: Cannot run program "/home/christoph/arduino-1.5.7/hardware/arduino/tools/lpc_upload.sh": java.io.IOException: error=2, Datei oder Verzeichnis nicht gefunden

bobcousins

LPC1114 version: I don't have LPC8xx yet but I do have several LPC11xx boards so I though I would have a go at it. I wanted try the "variant" support. It proved a little more tricky, the IDE does not automatically build the required library, it has to be pre-built with makefile and put into source tree. Possibly there is a better way to do it, I might make some inquiries on dev list.

There is a git gui (command "git gui" or "gitk") which runs on Linux and Windows. There are a few things I do on the command line still but generally I use the GUI for most regular operations, commit, push. The GUI is not totally slick as it could be, but generally OK. I would love to have a simpler/better version. Github have a windows client, but I don't use it.


I tried to install OpenLasp like you described it:

Installation procedure:

    Copy the Arduino/hardware folder to your sketches folder
    Copy the OpenLaspExamples folder to your sketches folder
    Restart Arduino IDE

But it didn't work as expected.


In what way did it not work? I just tried it on Linux, and it worked the way I expected. There are some changes needed to the lpc_upload.sh script, I hadn't quite finished that.

To be clear, there is an Arduino "install" folder, and a "user" sketch folder. OpenLasp was designed to be installed into the user folder.

The paths will be different if you install elsewhere, and  it may/may not work. It seems from your later message that it compiles but doesn't find the right tools folder.

I made a couple of assumptions, 1) it is better to install into user folder rather than patching the Arduino install,
2) an installer is not required, as it is a simple folder copy

I could be wrong about both of those things!
Please ask questions in the forum so everyone can benefit. PM me for paid work.

ChrisMicro

> 2) an installer is not required, as it is a simple folder copy
I like simplicity, so I think it is ok to install the whole thing in the user folder.
But on my system it didn't work so I copied the things into the correct "install" folders. Probably it is a issue of the Arduino IDE version: I have 1.5.7 32bit on Ubuntu.

There is another issue. The bash script for the programmer didn't work:
https://github.com/ChrisMicro/OpenLasp/commit/466c9fbf15e707077878719058f8e0677d2b5a55
and it is necessary to set the "execution bits" of the files.

ChrisMicro

Now I tried a second time the installation you described: It worked. So thats OK.
I also saw that you pulled the batch file modification.

graynomad

Meanwhile back at the IDE, I installed the latest version (7.3.0) and have spent half the day getting my previous projects to compile.

Did I mention that I hate dicking with tool chains? :)

Anyway all seems to work now.

I have installed EGit and tried to grab the repo but it asked me too many damn questions and by that time I'd had a gut full.

______
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

hwhardsoft

Hey this topic looks very interesting. I've written a Simon Says game for the LPC810 under the LPCXpresso IDE and I'm very curious to port my code to the Arduino IDE.

ChrisMicro

>I've written a Simon Says game
Hi hwhardsoft,
I saw your program before. It is quite nice. Because I was looking for some way to produce sound, I found your project.
If you want it should be easy to write your code arduino compatible.
There is a sound function
https://github.com/bobc/OpenLasp/blob/master/OpenLaspExamples/lpc810/example05_toneMelody/example05_toneMelody.ino

And the Button functions are working also:
https://github.com/bobc/OpenLasp/blob/master/OpenLaspExamples/lpc810/example03_Button/example03_Button.ino

At the moment I'm experimenting with some none square wave sounds:
https://github.com/ChrisMicro/LPC810_CodeBase/blob/master/src/example50_sinwaveDDS.c


ChrisMicro

Greynomad wrote:
>Did I mention that I hate dicking with tool chains? smiley

I can understand that. Yesterday I was fighting to set up the tool chain for the Arduino IDE.
But you shouldn't give up. It is really good to have Git inside Eclipse.

@bob:
In the current version of your repo is a problem for the LPC8: it runs only half speed. This is bad because the serial port is not working as expected.
Somewhere in the initialization must be an error.
In my repo it is running with the desired speed:
https://github.com/ChrisMicro/LPC810_CodeBase

mrburnette

#41
Sep 23, 2014, 04:09 pm Last Edit: Sep 23, 2014, 04:11 pm by mrburnette Reason: 1
Just a note for members who want to play around with the LPC810 but are not ready to move into the Arduino GUI environment and muck around...

Adafruit sells the LPC810 for too much, but the write-up on using the default (free) tool chain is pretty good and will get one started without messing up their Arduino environment.  Later, if they decide to continue, they can move to the 1.5.x environment and use the new library.

https://learn.adafruit.com/getting-started-with-the-lpc810/setting-up-an-arm-toolchain

Good luck, y'all.  I've been playing around with the ARM PSoC 4200 for about 3 months and am just now getting comfortable not working in C++.  I've flattened a few C++ libs to work with the PSoC Creator which uses the GCC toolchain, but defaults to C.  Defaulting to C++ is supported (google it) but since I was only playing with the hardware and not too concerned about the ARM, I really did not go down that road.

Ray


PSoC experiences here: http://www.hackster.io/rayburne

graynomad

I got the PSoC dev system on DVD a while back but just have too much to learn as it is so it's still in the drawer. Nice stuff though.

______
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

mrburnette


I got the PSoC dev system on DVD a while back but just have too much to learn as it is so it's still in the drawer. Nice stuff though.
______
Rob


Of course, right now Cypress is running the 4200 PSoC at unit quantities of $1 each until the end of the month:
http://www.cypress.com/?id=2218

Personally, I have been using the $4 dollar 4200 Prototype board: http://www.cypress.com/?rID=92146
and the 4200 Pioneer board: http://www.cypress.com/?rID=77780

Why the $25 Pioneer board?  Because the GUI will allow full register level debugging, breakpoints, etc!
You do not get debugging on the $4 board.

My personal experience has been favorable but somewhat frustrating and primarily along the lines that it takes way too much effort for the hobbyist ("joe arduino") to use this technology.  The PSoC learning curve is steep... you will waste 30 days watching videos, digging through datasheets (IF PDFs were trees, PSoC would leave the Earth barren), and watching videos.  Yes, much of the information is only available through video training.  I was able to do most of my projects in the 2nd month and was comfortable with the GUI by the end of the 3rd month.  My trip was a self-imposed, educational trek... Been there, done that (now.)

Ray

For those unfamiliar with the PSoC:
Quote

LCD Direct Drive   Yes
No. of Op Amps   2
CPU Core   ARM Cortex-M0
Max. Operating Frequency (MHz)   48
Automotive Qualified   N
CapSense   Yes
Min. Operating Voltage (V)   1.71
Max. Operating Voltage (V)   5.50
Min. Operating Temp. (°C)   -40
Max. Operating Temp. (°C)   85
No. of Dedicated Comparators   2
No. of GPIOs   36
SRAM (KB)   4
No. of Dedicated Timer/Counter/PWM Blocks   4
No. of CAN Controllers   0
No. of Serial Communication Blocks   2
No. of Universal Digital Blocks   4
Dedicated ADC (#Max Resolution @ Sample Rate)   SAR (1, 12-bit @ 1 msps)
Flash (KB)   32


ChrisMicro

>Adafruit sells the LPC810 for too much, but the write-up on using the default (free) tool chain is pretty good and will get one started >without messing up their Arduino environment.

Ähhmm ... in this thread we are not messing up the Arduino environment.
We are now in a stage where you only copy two folders in the Arduino-Sketch-Folder and it works. Thats it. You can compile and donwload the examples.

Go Up