Go Down

Topic: Working on USA 120 volts (Read 5832 times) previous topic - next topic

normoldboy

Just received my 101 kit via Elektor. Examining the parts, I noticed the kit came with 240V European input cable. However, the transformer data indicates 100-240V input and of course 12v dc out. If I use an input cable for USA 120V, will the output affect the kit requirements? The voltage drop from using 120V vs 240V should be significant, but I have not checked it yet, do not want to cause my self problems.

Chagrin

A 100-240V power supply is not an uncommon thing; it will work just fine. The typical change in efficiency for a power supply like this, 240V vs 110V, is about 3% difference.

ejo60

These switching power supplies are smart nowadays, and are supposed to take care of it.

normoldboy

I thought so , but I wanted to check first with any one that may have had the same dilemma. I also noticed that my Frame came pre assembled with pop rivets in the eight corners. The side that has the Arduino  power connector has the head of 5 of the eight (8) rivets have popped off. The frame looks sturdy with out these heads but I am concerned with misalignment. I could replace these rivets but would it make any difference once all of the interior rails are mounted. Another concern is that if I put thread lock on all of the bolts, levelling the sliders later would be a nightmare. Is there a written procedure for levelling the interior mechanics before.
Thanks, Norm

benvolio9mm

I just picked up a replacement cable to attach the adapter to the wall. They are easy to find; sometimes listed as laptop replacement cables.

benvolio9mm

Another concern is that if I put thread lock on all of the bolts, levelling the sliders later would be a nightmare. Is there a written procedure for levelling the interior mechanics before.
Thanks, Norm
I would go ahead and use the thread lock and worry about alignment later. The rails fit pretty snug and you can't do much about the alignment of any individual rail. You will have to align the X axis relative the Y axis later, but this is performed by making adjustments to the belts and pulley gears, not the rails.

benvolio9mm

Here is something I discovered today.

I haven't gotten my printer working yet and haven't had all the time I would like to work on it. The printer is assembled but when I try to print it resets during the first layer. I thought the problem was the Ramps board overheating. A while ago I ordered some additional cooling fans and installed them today. They work great and I am drawing power for them directly from the power supply. So I powered up the printer and started a job. Same result as before; the printer reset about the same place as before.

After several iterative test runs all yielding the same results, I got curious and stuck my voltmeter on the power supply terminal. The thing is, I could hear my fans ramping down and see the LED strip flickering right before the reset. I started a new job with my leads monitoring the power supply. With the printer off I read 12 volts. With printer on I get 11 volts. Once I start a job I see the potential drop slowly but steadily until it hits about 10 volts and the system resets.

The power supply that shipped with the printer is rated at 5.42 amps output. It appears to be insufficient current to run a print job. I am wondering if anyone else has had problems with this. Maybe it's only because I am in the US and using a lower input voltage than in most other countries. I plan to fix the problem by getting a new 12 volt power supply that can supply more current.

kengdahl

Have you checked if any wires get very hot when running the printer?`If they do it might be a case of a bad connection of a bad wire.

I just had the same issue with a Prusa we have at the office.

Also check the VREF to the Z-axis motor on the stepper driver. If it's too low the printer could reset itself.

normoldboy

benvolio9mm:

If you are trying to print a g file that is too large for your printer or not twerked for your printer, then the printer may misbehave and cut off. get a g file that you know will fit within the parameters of your machine and try printing that without loading the filament. Observe the action of all your motors and the swing of the XY bed to see if you can spot any difficulty before it turns off.

Also see the posting of "failure to communicate" and see if maybe you have that same problem.

benvolio9mm

The z axis vref I have checked several times but will check again. I haven't noticed the wires overheating but will check that too later today.

The g-code files I have tried to print are small. The typical file I have been using has a base of about 1.5" diameter. I have the same problem with any file I use whether it is generated by slicer, other software or files that I download including the calibration g-code file.

Thanks for the feedback.

normoldboy

beenvolio9mm:

You may know this anyway, but if you do not reset and then rehome your machine after, some settings are left in the firmware. If you reset, then the firmware will 00.00 all of your settings. This is bad because when the x axis is in the home position it must be 140mm, and when the y axis is in the home position it must be 110mm and the z axis must be 00.00 Before you print you must rehome your machine even though you have just cut it on. The g-code is sliced with this in mind.

benvolio9mm

Have you checked if any wires get very hot when running the printer?`If they do it might be a case of a bad connection of a bad wire.

I just had the same issue with a Prusa we have at the office.
I checked the power supply wires for overheating while printing. The wires are noticeably warmer than ambient when the printer is powered on or printing but I would not say they are hot to the touch. I tried to hit it with my IR gun which seems to suggest the wires don't get any hotter than 31 degrees C, which is near ambient (about 28 degrees). I soldered the power supply wires pretty solidly--I think I used a little too much solder actually--and I can't see any damage to the wires. The terminal block connections look good and I re-positioned them for good measure. I'm still hoping a new power supply will solve it. Either way I'm having fun troubleshooting the issue.

benvolio9mm

beenvolio9mm:

You may know this anyway, but if you do not reset and then rehome your machine after, some settings are left in the firmware. If you reset, then the firmware will 00.00 all of your settings. This is bad because when the x axis is in the home position it must be 140mm, and when the y axis is in the home position it must be 110mm and the z axis must be 00.00 Before you print you must rehome your machine even though you have just cut it on. The g-code is sliced with this in mind.
Thanks for the feedback. I did figure this out early on when, after a reset, I forgot to home and tried to print a new job. The extruder then tried to print outside of the bed. Lol.

normoldboy

benvolio9mm :

One other thing. If your Z axis screw groves are not fairly vertical, it puts a load on the Z motor that may cause shutdown. It happened to me as soon as I started checking the running of the motors. See "Exercising the X,Y, and Z motors" I had not snugged down the mounting screws and the screw was binding and the motor got hot and shut down. I snugged down the screws, (the ones that have the o-ring shock absorbers on them). I also lubricated the screw and then did not have any more problems. The motor still gets hot, but no more binding of the screw gear, no more cutoff.

benvolio9mm

I don't think it is related to z axis movement. The reset occurs during x and y axis movement. Since I haven't gotten past the first print layer the z axis motor really isn't moving at all.

Go Up