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Topic: Share tips you have come across (Read 85381 times) previous topic - next topic

Jiggy-Ninja

Now see, brilliant stuff like that is what this thread was made for!
Hackaday: https://hackaday.io/MarkRD
Advanced C++ Techniques: https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=493075.0

TKall

In #59, bottom photo, is that a fan?

larryd

In #59, bottom photo, is that a fan?
Yes 12v, for blowing or sucking the flux fumes away from the immediate area.  ;)

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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

TKall

Before he was a Colonel, Mr. Bill Kilgore said, "I love the smell of solder flux in the morning."  True story.

larryd

#64
Jan 22, 2017, 11:12 pm Last Edit: Jan 22, 2017, 11:14 pm by LarryD
With a little imagination and some activated charcoal you could come up with an adequate air filter.




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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

tinman13kup

I made one of these a while back.
Works quite well.

http://vpapanik.blogspot.ca/?view=classic



Edit
You can add more weight at the end with a neodymium magnet.

This is something I've been wanting to make. I had plans for making it a part of a jig that holds the pcb, but I was unsure if the small point would try to penetrate the smd when heat was applied. I was planning on using a spring loaded adjustable arm with an aluminum tip.
  I've had problems in the past with some of the small ic's shifting just enough to cause problems, which I will admit I bring on myself by using leadless chips, but I rather like them in the end product.
Tom
It's not a hobby if you're not having fun doing it. Step back and breathe

larryd

#66
Jan 22, 2017, 11:58 pm Last Edit: Jan 23, 2017, 10:36 pm by LarryD
On Mine, I used a stainless steel bolt for the weight and the pivot bearing.
Used the section that has no threads.
The part on the table was made 1 inch long.



For the rod, I used a .064 .08 inch stainless steel welding rod cut to length and sharpened on the business end.


Edit:
Never had problems with the point going into a component.
If you put a set screw in the weight you could easily adjust its position on the rod.

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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#67
Jan 23, 2017, 12:38 am Last Edit: Jan 23, 2017, 12:39 am by LarryD
To add a series resistor to a LED, consider this using this method.

Add heat shrink as needed to the assembly.




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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#68
Jan 23, 2017, 12:43 am Last Edit: Jan 23, 2017, 12:43 am by LarryD
Karma point to the first person who knows what this is:




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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

CrossRoads

Springs for a reverb/echo effects box. Little on the short side.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

CrossRoads

I like the resistor/LED method also, end of with sturdy legs to plug into breadboards.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

larryd

#71
Jan 23, 2017, 02:08 am Last Edit: Feb 23, 2017, 01:22 am by LarryD
Springs for a reverb/echo effects box. Little on the short side.
Now you cannot be that old.  ;)

This is a 'Pull Spring Vise tool'

I made my first version of this back in my teens. Only a couple of years ago.

This is a more pretty version of the same tool I came up with back then.

Here is a PDF discussion of the construction and use of this pull spring vise tool:




Attached is the PDF file with all the instruction images.


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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

CrossRoads

Oh yeah. Bought a Kustom guitar amp back in like 1981, took out the reverb spring box and made an op-amp buffer for it instead so I could use it separately from the amp.

I've only done a project or two, back in 1981, using point to point soldering with ethernet type wiring to regular PCB sockets epoxied down on perfboard when I was a co-op student (like an intern) in college.  Then the lab lead showed me wirewrap, and I've never done point to point soldering since unless it was a dirt-simple project, and even then I  hated doing it.  Any one-off projects now are wirewrapped, and the pins cut short if the board needs to be lower height.

Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

TKall

Quote
To add a series resistor to a LED, consider this using this method.
That is a pretty good idea.  

larryd

#74
Jan 23, 2017, 07:13 pm Last Edit: Feb 14, 2017, 03:05 am by LarryD
Interesting.
I thought the spring vise PDF would have had some interest.
I guess if you haven't done tinning of a lot of individual wires without a solder pot, one wouldn't appreciate the clamping action of a spring on all your wires at once. ;)

Solder pot.



vs





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No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

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