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Topic: RBBB's are more expensive now, NOOOOOOOOOOO (Read 7369 times) previous topic - next topic

CrossRoads

Not called that in Massachussetts :-)
The highway number is used in multiple places.
If you look at the east coast, I-95 goes from Woodstock, CA thru Maine all way Florida, with I-195, 295, 395, 495, (didn't see 595 while browsing) 695, 795 repeated in different places as it goes around cities & stuff.
Looks like a quirk, am sure there is an explanation behind it.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

retrolefty

All I know about the interstate numbering system is ones ending in odd numbers run nominally north and south and even ones run east and west. Also many state highways can have several names if they connect to other highways that then share a segment. Classic case the Golden Gate bridge is both correctly named highway 101 and highway 1.

paulb

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Providence, RI? Can I stop in & say Hi sometime? I'm off I-495 in MA, not far away.


Sure we love to talk to customers and don't mind doing retail (so far anyway) - but you should call first to make sure someone will be here. We both teach and are out and about a bit.

The shop number is 401 709-2424

Paul

liudr


All I know about the interstate numbering system is ones ending in odd numbers run nominally north and south and even ones run east and west. Also many state highways can have several names if they connect to other highways that then share a segment. Classic case the Golden Gate bridge is both correctly named highway 101 and highway 1.


I watched a history program about US highways. I think tens are east-west, while fives are north-south. Now I remember there's probably an I-295 in NYC. I spent some time on the Long Island. The I-495 has 55 speed limit but everybody was going at 75-85. Back where I live they do 60-65 on 55 highways.

BTW, digikey in not far from my place, only about 4 hours drive!

Ran Talbott

The 3-digit Interstates are "loop" and "branch" routes that encircle big cities (like I-465 around Indianapolis),  or bypass them to interconnect inter-city freeways (like the x80 series in the SF Bay Area).

The numbers are formed by prefixing a digit to the number of the main Interstate route they connect to.

The GG bridge carries both state route 1 and US route 101.

And "route" is an important word: in many cases (especially non-freeway ones), a state/federal "route" can be just a designation for a "logical" path over a series of local highways, and even city streets. I remember being in a small town in Maine where there were no freeways,  and driving down a street with a signpost the size of a medium tree showing it was designated state routes 117 North, 92 South, 84 and 77 East, and US route 52 East (I'm sure those numbers are all wrong, but you get the idea).

kg4wsv

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The 3-digit Interstates are "loop" and "branch" routes that encircle big cities (like I-465 around Indianapolis),  or bypass them to interconnect inter-city freeways (like the x80 series in the SF Bay Area).

The numbers are formed by prefixing a digit to the number of the main Interstate route they connect to.


Yep, and that leading digit indicates a loop if it's an even number, or a spur if it's an odd number. The N/S/E/W designation is supposed to follow that of the "parent" interstate.

There was a bit of discussion when I565 in north Alabama opened.  I65 is a N-S route, so by definition 565 is a N-S route as well.  The problem is, 565 is about 20 miles long but only covers about 2 miles north to south.  Very confusing, even for locals, especially for visitors.  The highway department finally relented and relabeled it E-W.

-j

bill2009

I really like the RBBB. I use mine all the time and I've used the schematic a bunch as the basis for my own work.

MichaelMeissner

I'm not sure it makes economic sense to buy kits like the RBBB these days, unless you have special needs, as the integrated devices are now in the same range.

Lets see, the Sparkfun Pro Mini (328p based) is $10 (currently out of stock, but presumably they will restock shortly).  There are a lot of clones of the Pro Mini running around, depending on how you feel about using a cloned product.

Pololu just announced a $13 32U4 based microprocessor, A-Star: http://www.pololu.com/product/3101

Adafruit recently mentioned that they will be coming out with a Pro Trinket, that I think they said would be 328p based.

The Digispark Pro is currently in kickstarter, and when it hits retail, it will be in that range.

wizdum


I'm not sure it makes economic sense to buy kits like the RBBB these days, unless you have special needs, as the integrated devices are now in the same range.

Lets see, the Sparkfun Pro Mini (328p based) is $10 (currently out of stock, but presumably they will restock shortly).  There are a lot of clones of the Pro Mini running around, depending on how you feel about using a cloned product.

Pololu just announced a $13 32U4 based microprocessor, A-Star: http://www.pololu.com/product/3101

Adafruit recently mentioned that they will be coming out with a Pro Trinket, that I think they said would be 328p based.

The Digispark Pro is currently in kickstarter, and when it hits retail, it will be in that range.


I get my Arduino Pro Mini clones on eBay, $20 for 5. They ship out of New York. I just made a socket for them in my designs, so if a user burns up something in it, I can just mail them a new one.
"Anyone who isn't confused really doesn't understand the situation."

Electronic props for Airsoft, paintball, and laser tag -> www.nightscapetech.com

Paul__B

Of course, by my training, "RBBB" always refers to Right Bundle Branch Block - as it does for the first five entries in Google.   :D

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