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Topic: Arduino Quadcopter (Read 20118 times) previous topic - next topic

Tinito16

Hi,

I must start by saying I am a total beginner at this, microcontroller projects, and I am trying to take it all in as fast as possible. I have a class project which involves making an automatically stabilizing quadcopter. Now my question is, what board would be best for this kind of project? I'm going to have a wireless video camera, a gyro, an accelerometer and an altimeter on the little UAV, plus MAYBE a couple of proximity sensors, depending on how much everything weighs.

I've looked preliminarily at aeroquadstore.com and have been looking at the AeroQuad Shield 2.0 with the Arduino Mega 2560, ITG 3200 triple axis gyro and the BMA 180 triple axis accelerometer as filling my needs, but I would appreciate input from people who have experience with Arduino and DIY projects.

Thanks in advance!

zoomkat

Search the old forum below for quadcopter for previous discussions on the subject.

http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl
Google forum search: Use Google Advanced Search and use Http://forum.arduino.cc/index in the "site or domain:" box.

retrolefty

Quote
I would appreciate input from people who have experience with Arduino and DIY projects.


Well my input would be that you have selected a most difficult project for someone with no prior experience with microcontrollers. I would think you would be much better off starting with a few less ambitious projects while you learn and gain experience.

But good luck either way.

Lefty

Binette228

Hi,

Yeah it is a very ambitious project and it will cost as much!
But remember that the Arduino cannot process video...

But anyway, you should go look here: www.diydrones.com/
A lot of people there did what you want to do.

I wish you luck and wish you'll realise this!
(Don't forget to post here what you made if you do it!)  :)

david97

I think it depends on how many out/inputs you would need as the smaller boards dont have many out/inputs. I would start designing your quadcopter first and then once you have figured out how many outputs and inputs you need buy the board that is the lightest weight but still has enough out/inputs and memory for your code. This page lists all the boards avaible or if none of them suit you could try buying a FTDI cable, the main chip you have decided on, a 16MHZ resonator, a 5V regulator, and build one yourself. There are plenty of tutorails online.

links.
Arduino boards


Good luck with your project, David.

david97

I think it depends on how many out/inputs you would need as the smaller boards dont have many out/inputs. I would start designing your quadcopter first and then once you have figured out how many outputs and inputs you need buy the board that is the lightest weight but still has enough out/inputs and memory for your code. This page lists all the boards avaible or if none of them suit you could try buying a FTDI cable, the main chip you have decided on, a 16MHZ resonator, a 5V regulator, and build one yourself. There are plenty of tutorails online.

LINKS
arduino boards      http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Boards
Build your own      http://lmgtfy.com/?q=How+to+build+a+arduino+board.

Good luck with your project, David.

sbright33

I understand how a small cheap gyro like ENC-03r on the Quadboard can keep a copter from slowly rotating.  Using a 328 to sample, it should be able to measure as small as about 70deg / minute of rotation.  This is fine for Yaw, anything better and you'd need a compass.

Stupid Question alert:

But how does that keep it from flipping over?  70 deg of pitch or roll in a minute and it would nearly be upside down!
This would not be a problem for a traditional copter, but a Quadrotor is inherently unstable?
It requires another sensor or human input at the stick?

How does this
http://www.litehawk.ca/discover%20litehawk%20xl.html
have 0 Yaw for 1 minute without any stick input?
If you fall... I'll be there for you!
-Floor

Skype Brighteyes3333
(262) 696-9619

John_S

Quote
I must start by saying I am a total beginner at this...

I would get "Blink without delay" down pat before you venture too far.  ;)
http://jsrintervalometers.blogspot.ca

sbright33

Actually you can buy a kit with instructions for $100.  I agree it is difficult, but not impossible for a Beginner!
If you fall... I'll be there for you!
-Floor

Skype Brighteyes3333
(262) 696-9619

MarkT


I understand how a small cheap gyro like ENC-03r on the Quadboard can keep a copter from slowly rotating.  Using a 328 to sample, it should be able to measure as small as about 70deg / minute of rotation.  This is fine for Yaw, anything better and you'd need a compass.

Stupid Question alert:

But how does that keep it from flipping over?  70 deg of pitch or roll in a minute and it would nearly be upside down!
This would not be a problem for a traditional copter, but a Quadrotor is inherently unstable?
It requires another sensor or human input at the stick?


I don't call that a stupid question - the answer is that you use gyros for short term control but correct their drift using the accelerometer (low pass filtered).  With 3 axis gyros you should be able to maintain accurate rotation matrix over timescales of seconds, the long term accelerometer data is only useable if the craft isn't constantly tumbling, but that's unlikely.
[ I won't respond to messages, use the forum please ]

sbright33

The models I've seen don't have accelerometers, only ENC-03 gyro.  I'm guessing they're dependent on human input every second or so, sorta like an old fashioned airplane.  No answer for my Litehawk?  It's a cheap toy!
If you fall... I'll be there for you!
-Floor

Skype Brighteyes3333
(262) 696-9619

Oberling

]:D Why dont you try to build a ground based robot with the same functions first? :smiley-red: :smiley-eek-blue: XD :smiley-surprise: :| :smiley-sad-blue: :smiley-mr-green: :D :. :( :smiley-sleep: ]:D ]:) :smiley-yell: :* :smiley-sweat: ;) $) :smiley-roll-blue: :smiley-zipper: =( :smiley-eek: :% :smiley-roll: :smiley-fat: 8) :~ ^_^ :smiley-slim: :smiley-roll-sweat: :0 :P :)

KirAsh4

sbright33, you should read up on PID processing. You would never rely strictly on sensor data. You need to process the data and smooth it out which eliminates spikes and noise.  This would allow you to maintain a very stable platform whether it has stick input or not.  PID affects how smooth or jerky a quad behaves. The higher the PID numbers, the more sluggish it gets.  The lower and you get a more responsive quad, but also very unpredictable.  It's all in the coding around the various sensors and also how well trained and comfortable you are with your gear. Some people fly acrobatics with those things, flipping them on purpose. Those guys have very little PID control. For camera and video platform like what I do, I have a medium setting to keep things stable with minimal stick input. For people just learning to fly, I always give them a much higher PID setting to get them used to the thing.

Oberling, if all you plan on doing is spam smilies, and not follow suggestions or instructions given to you (in the installation forum), then I suggest you find a different board to do that on.

sbright33

With smoothing, how can you detect <70deg of rotation / minute from a Piezo Gyro?  I don't see how smoothing helps with this problem.  You would be smoothing out real changes above this number.  It is the limit of the sensors ability to detect slow changes.  Somewhere in this neighborhood.  You would need an accelerometer, as Mark suggested.  What about most models which do not have them?  How do they stay upright?
If you fall... I'll be there for you!
-Floor

Skype Brighteyes3333
(262) 696-9619

MarkT

I know some RC controlled models use IR sensors to determine the horizon (sky cold, ground warm).
[ I won't respond to messages, use the forum please ]

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