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Topic: What is this component ? (Read 411 times) previous topic - next topic

tryptophane

Nov 30, 2017, 08:10 pm Last Edit: Nov 30, 2017, 08:52 pm by tryptophane
Hello !

Does anyone know which component is this ? With "GD WOIM" written...

I've found an old electronic board and i can't find it on Google... :smiley-confuse:

Thank you !

raschemmel

Arduino UNOs, Pro-Minis, ATMega328, ATtiny85, LCDs, MCP4162, keypads,<br />DS18B20s,74c922,nRF24L01, RS232, SD card, RC fixed wing, quadcopter

tryptophane


PaulRB

#3
Nov 30, 2017, 08:57 pm Last Edit: Nov 30, 2017, 09:00 pm by PaulRB

Diode bridge recitifier?

vinceherman

#4
Nov 30, 2017, 09:02 pm Last Edit: Nov 30, 2017, 09:03 pm by vinceherman
   ~
+    -
   ~

I think its a diode bridge rectifier, too.


PaulRB

If we are correct (pretty sure we are) it is basically 4 diodes in a single package, arranged in a diamond shape. It turns AC current into DC current (albeit a very lumpy DC current). Those big caps then smooth this into a more steady DC current.

Southpark

#6
Nov 30, 2017, 09:22 pm Last Edit: Nov 30, 2017, 09:23 pm by Southpark
Just google this:

"W01M"

raschemmel

#7
Nov 30, 2017, 09:44 pm Last Edit: Nov 30, 2017, 09:45 pm by raschemmel
OR,
you could just click here:

(but that would be too easy...)
Arduino UNOs, Pro-Minis, ATMega328, ATtiny85, LCDs, MCP4162, keypads,<br />DS18B20s,74c922,nRF24L01, RS232, SD card, RC fixed wing, quadcopter

rogertee

it is called a bridge rectifier has 4 leads ac voltage into sine wave pins you get dc voltage from + - pins

tryptophane

Really thank you for you answers ! Now I know !

MarkT

The legend "BR1" means "bridge recitifier 1".  This is a power supply, there will be a transformer secondary
connected to this board providing the low-voltage AC, and probably some 78XX / 79XX voltage regulators down
the line to provide regulated voltage rails (given the capacitor voltage rating, something like +/-12, 18 or 24V)

(unless this is an unregulated supply).

This power supply design, transformer/bridge rectifier/smoothing cap/linear regulator is not used
in modern equipment, which almost invariably uses switch-mode converters these days which are >10 times
smaller and lighter for a given power level.

I deduce this board is at least 15 years old.
[ I will NOT respond to personal messages, I WILL delete them, use the forum please ]

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