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Topic: Whats with the anti-arduino sentiment? (Read 3 times) previous topic - next topic

Graynomad

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try talking to a professional photographer who earns (earned) a living from stock photography some time.

That would be me  :0

Actually I don't give a toss because I don't need to earn money from photography any more, and what I do earn comes from photographing things I like not things the agency has on it's wish list because they will be more likely to sell.

______
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

Vanyamba

Just imagine the DIY electronics technology of near future. The customer draws some scheme from functional blocks, on-line in the browser, then click 'Buy' and after near half a day one get ready board in a box, after day or several - ready to use device in the stylish case. It's like to send document to the printer.

liudr


Just imagine the DIY electronics technology of near future. The customer draws some scheme from functional blocks, on-line in the browser, then click 'Buy' and after near half a day one get ready board in a box, after day or several - ready to use device in the stylish case. It's like to send document to the printer.


Just to follow your lead, in some foreseeable future, everyone will have a rep-rap on their desktop to print out 3-D objects and possibly circuits on flexible substrates and wear them to work. I guess the rep-rap project must have upset some mechanical engineers, who think only they have been given the power to create 3-D objects with their knowledge of CNC and professional 3-D prototype machines. Way back, maybe the CNCs had upset many old-fashion machinists, who would depend on their hands to make parts from mills and lathes. And even way back, when machines replaced hand tools, ...

I can see why EE people may dislike arduinos, as to all the learning that an arduinoist didn't do. But time you spent=stuff you learned. I've spent my time with arduino but I never learned the basic principals of I2C bus. My RTC and EEPROM still work just fine. I think with arduino, I can opt to not spend time to learn things that are only relevant to electrical engineers. They're good at what they do, knowing all the details of specific stuff that all ICs depend on, so the rest of us can enjoy their fruits without having to bare their burden to plant, grow, and harvest.

This goes to physicists as well. They work out all the basic principles so everyone else can use their applications. Have you heard any physicist ranting about being under appreciated on any website lately? Well, they should. ]:) All of YOU, wasting the best computer ever grown on this planet with the easy stuff in college, being couch potatoes every night, leaving us to attack the most difficult problems, and without enough funding or appreciation. =(

Vanyamba

I can see why EE people may dislike arduinos...


Where did you see an EE people? Was it a EE man or a EE woman?

logic

The customer draws some scheme from functional blocks, on-line in the browser, then click 'Buy' and after near half a day one get ready board in a box, after day or several - ready to use device in the stylish case.
The software side is already starting to get there. For example, Sprog! and Scratch, while mainly aimed at teaching programming, are a great proof of concept, along with more advanced-user-friendly tools like Yahoo! Pipes. Even Google got in on the action with App Inventor for building Android applications. With all of these, there's very little traditional programming; instead, they're visually modelling the logic involved: drag, drop, done.

We're a little behind on the hardware side, but all the underlying pieces are already there: low-cost 3D printing, low-cost CNC, low-cost board fab, and this idea of stackable/reusable hardware. The next 10-20 years are going to be pretty cool. :)
-Ed
Felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas.

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