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Topic: How do I hardwire my Arduino circuit? (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

Daanii

My device now works on the breadboard, with wires running to the Arduino. Now I want to wire the circuit up and install it. It's not a complicated circuit, so I plan to use perforated circuit board and soldering wires rather than making a printed circuit board.

What do I need to replace the Arduino in the circuit besides just the ATMega chip? I'm using the SPI pins and some of the digital and analog pins. But nothing like the USB port or the like.

Thank you.

biocow

http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Standalone

Or use that search box up thar in the top right to search 'standalone'
10 PRINT CHR$(7)
20 GOTO 10

Daanii

#2
Feb 17, 2011, 11:38 pm Last Edit: Feb 17, 2011, 11:57 pm by Daanii Reason: 1
Thanks, that's exactly what I needed. I did use the search box, but did not use the word "standalone" and was stymied.

UPDATE: The Really Bare Bones Board kit mentioned in the Playground post looks ideal for me. I'll probably use that.

liudr

The RBBB is pretty cheap, maybe the cheapest. I would go with it. They also sell cheap 3-axis accelerometers. I got one for my music box project.

Daanii


They also sell cheap 3-axis accelerometers.


Good point. I saw those accelerometers. Plus the gyroscopes. Besides the RBBB Arduino, I need a set of accelerometers plus gyroscopes. Glad I was pointed to that site.

To ask another rather stupid question, what gauge wire is best for wiring this all up?

liudr

24AWG. Single strand is easy to solder but is rigid and could break but multistrand is soft but I found it hard to solder.

CrossRoads

Soldering is a pain in the butt.  I prefer wirewrapping it all together. I solder some sockets (just the corners) in place on a single sided perfboard, then wirewrap from there.
And I gave up on sockets even - i just use wirewrap socket strips like these since you can't get a socket wide enough to plug a promini into.
http://www.marcospecialties.com/product.asp?ic=SIP20L
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

Daanii


I prefer wirewrapping it all together.


What wire wrap tool do you use?

CrossRoads

I have a little manual wrapper, looks like one of these for 30 guage wire. Got it back in college, still works great.
Wire stripper in the middle, wraps on one end, unwraps on the other (for the occasional miswire).
http://www.google.com/products/catalog?hl=en&sugexp=ldymls&xhr=t&q=wire+wrap+tool&cp=9&rlz=1R2ADFA_enUS417&wrapid=tljp1298010769798010&um=1&ie=UTF-8&cid=15276762113572041553&ei=mBJeTcCMG4SglAf_hpiADA&sa=X&oi=product_catalog_result&ct=image&resnum=5&sqi=2&ved=0CDwQ8gIwBA#
I also have a cheaper Radio Shack version, $6, that my wife prefers as it has a spinny top on it. I must say it was a bit of shock at how much it cost when I thought I had lost it (and bought the Radio Shack one as a replacement - and had to hit 3 stores to find one).  Luckily I found it again later.  You can see it in this picture.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

Daanii

That's really bizarre that a manual wire wrap tool goes for $50. Especially when the Radio Shack version sells for $6.

It sounds like you find 30 gauge wire to work well. Is that right?

CrossRoads

30 guage works wonderfully.
Heavier stuff is good for off board connections, where some wiggling could occur as you assemble/disassemble during build/debug/repairs, etc. But laying down wire that will not be moving especially when several chips are involved, I find wirewrap the way to go.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

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