Go Down

Topic: Completed Prototype.. What next? (Read 444 times) previous topic - next topic

JesseOpitz

Hey guys,

I have recently built a prototype for a fun gadget that I believe people will enjoy quite a bit. The next step I would like to take is to attempt a KickStarter, but of course, firstly, I need to get a full understanding of cost, time and labour.

This is where I need a point in the right direction. I'll list some of the questions that have been on my mind.

- Making a custom PCB? I'm more of a software guy, but my design is quite simple in terms of parts so would it be beneficial to hire some help in that department?

- Custom PCB manufacturers also provide a service to assemble. Does this include parts like Bluetooth modules, rechargable batteries, RGB LEDs, etc? Or will that be something done on my end?

Also to add to that - Will they install a micro controller? Do I have to install my code manually or can I provide them with a source code and have that done in the process as well?

Any help or a push in the right direction would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

larryd

#1
Feb 27, 2018, 07:54 am Last Edit: Feb 27, 2018, 07:56 am by larryd
Put 5 minutes in with Google.
If you pay, they will do.
Here is a starting point:
https://pcbshopper.com/   


No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

SurfingDude

As they say, there are many roads to Rome. One approach I have seen, in the USA, is to develop your design with a program like Eagle CAD, send the files to a company like OSH Park, buy the parts from an outfit like Newark Electronics, and solder on the parts yourself with trusty 60/40. When you need ROHS and Surface Mount parts things might get more complicated. A 3-D printed enclosure would be a nice finishing touch.

This works for hobby projects and prototypes where you only need a few units. For bigger volumes you may have to build some jigs or tools to make the job faster, for instance, a station to flash the firmware.

Since you are a software guy you might want to partner with someone with an engineering background as you go into volume. Some legal and accounting help may also be in order, especially if there is some intellectual property or wireless communication. It takes many skills.

In my world, which is HAM radio, most everything is done for personal satisfaction with the joy of having created something to brag about. Help is as near as the microphone. Some people turn their passion into products but there always seems to be the underlying spirit of openness.

Delta_G

In my world, which is HAM radio, most everything is done for personal satisfaction with the joy of having created something to brag about. Help is as near as the microphone. Some people turn their passion into products but there always seems to be the underlying spirit of openness.
I always hated that I never got into HAM and this is exactly why I wish I had. 
|| | ||| | || | ||  ~Woodstock

Please do not PM with technical questions or comments.  Keep Arduino stuff out on the boards where it belongs.

SurfingDude

I always hated that I never got into HAM and this is exactly why I wish I had. 
Well do it! In the USA it is easy, especially since they dropped the Morse code requirement. There are local HAM clubs all over the country or do what I first did and knock on the door of a house sporting a HAM antenna. Licensing is free and to get one you just pass a test administered by your local HAM club. They may charge just a few bucks to administer the test. There's a study guide that helps teach you the rules and the test is multiple choice, 70% is passing, and wrong answers don't count against you.

Coding Badly

I always hated that I never got into HAM and this is exactly why I wish I had.  
If you can post on this forum there is still time.

I believe the basic operators license exam can be taken online now.

While they no longer regularly meet they do have a set of helpful links...
https://dallasmakerspace.org/wiki/Amateur_Radio_Class


Go Up