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Topic: Power Consommation in my Project with 9 V battery (Read 267 times) previous topic - next topic

re100

Hi all arduino Famillies

I working on a project,now i try to test the project with a 9V battery Alcalin, i get a big problem right now by batterie decharge verry quickly.

1)Arduino Uno
2)LCD screen to display the result
3)And Load cell

I learn a lot of thing but i can figure out the right way to reduce the commation of circuit.

jremington

9V batteries are intended for smoke alarms, and are not suitable for Arduino projects.

For very low power battery operated projects, special techniques are required. Study this excellent tutorial for the details.

vinceherman

Is it a 9v battery like you would use in a smoke detector?
Those work for smoke detectors and transistor radios that pull almost zero amps.
But in an application where more current is needed, they are virtually useless.

Look at the datasheets for your components to see what current they require.
Choose a suitable power supply.

re100

9V batteries are intended for smoke alarms, and are not suitable for Arduino projects.

For very low power battery operated projects, special techniques are required. Study this excellent tutorial for the details.
thank you i'll study the new url you give me.

re100

Is it a 9v battery like you would use in a smoke detector?
Those work for smoke detectors and transistor radios that pull almost zero amps.
But in an application where more current is needed, they are virtually useless.

Look at the datasheets for your components to see what current they require.
Choose a suitable power supply.
thank i'll do it now

MarkT

To be a bit more constructive, small 9V alkaline batteries are probably good to 50mA or so before
gross-overload sets in - check the voltage if it falls significantly below 9V, its grossly overloaded!

Rechargable 9V batteries may provide more current, but are usually only 8.4V nominal, its always
good if you find the datasheet for a battery (which means avoid unbranded batteries, basically, they
are usually pretty rubbish capacity anyway)

For small energy-dense batteries nothing really competes with lithium chemistries, although LiPo
requires precautions due to the fire hazard.  LiFePO4 seem a good compromise, less fire risk, large
number of charge/discharge cycles.  You can find 6.4V and 9.6V LiFePO4 packs for RC models, usually
sold as "receiver packs", for instance.
[ I will NOT respond to personal messages, I WILL delete them, use the forum please ]

re100

To be a bit more constructive, small 9V alkaline batteries are probably good to 50mA or so before
gross-overload sets in - check the voltage if it falls significantly below 9V, its grossly overloaded!

Rechargable 9V batteries may provide more current, but are usually only 8.4V nominal, its always
good if you find the datasheet for a battery (which means avoid unbranded batteries, basically, they
are usually pretty rubbish capacity anyway)

For small energy-dense batteries nothing really competes with lithium chemistries, although LiPo
requires precautions due to the fire hazard.  LiFePO4 seem a good compromise, less fire risk, large
number of charge/discharge cycles.  You can find 6.4V and 9.6V LiFePO4 packs for RC models, usually
sold as "receiver packs", for instance.
I understand but the fact so,how and why i supossed to do, to get the battery of my program running for 6- 8 month when i used the arduino I2lcd with Arduino Pro Mini 328.

jremington

#7
Mar 15, 2018, 03:41 pm Last Edit: Mar 15, 2018, 03:41 pm by jremington
Quote
to get the battery of my program running for 6- 8 month
Use sleep mode and other power saving techniques. See link in reply #1.

vinceherman

#8
Mar 15, 2018, 04:18 pm Last Edit: Mar 15, 2018, 04:19 pm by vinceherman
I understand but the fact so,how and why i supossed to do, to get the battery of my program running for 6- 8 month when i used the arduino I2lcd with Arduino Pro Mini 328.
This was covered up in reply #2.

Quote
Look at the datasheets for your components to see what current they require.
Choose a suitable power supply.
So, go dig up the datasheets for your components.  Add up their current requirements.
If you do not have those data sheets, you can put an ammeter between the battery and your device and measure the current draw.  I have a watt meter that tells me the current.  That would work too.

Choose a battery with enough capacity to provide that power for 8 months.

Example:  You calculate a 100mA total current requirement from the datasheets.  That will consume 100mAh in one hour.  There are 5760 hours in 8 months.  You will consume 576Ah in 8 months.
Choose a battery with that capacity.


re100

This was covered up in reply #2.

So, go dig up the datasheets for your components.  Add up their current requirements.
If you do not have those data sheets, you can put an ammeter between the battery and your device and measure the current draw.  I have a watt meter that tells me the current.  That would work too.

Choose a battery with enough capacity to provide that power for 8 months.

Example:  You calculate a 100mA total current requirement from the datasheets.  That will consume 100mAh in one hour.  There are 5760 hours in 8 months.  You will consume 576Ah in 8 months.
Choose a battery with that capacity.


Thank you i'll do this process and tell you soon all the result

MarkT

If you want micropower(*) operation the Uno is definitely not the board to use as its not micropower and
cannot be configured as such because the USB interface takes constant power whether or not the
microcontroller is in sleep.

Something like a bare bones board or a board designed for micropower is needed.

http://www.home-automation-community.com/arduino-low-power-how-to-run-atmega328p-for-a-year-on-coin-cell-battery/

(*) micropower means very low power (microwatts on average), allowing for unattended battery operation.
[ I will NOT respond to personal messages, I WILL delete them, use the forum please ]

re100

If you want micropower(*) operation the Uno is definitely not the board to use as its not micropower and
cannot be configured as such because the USB interface takes constant power whether or not the
microcontroller is in sleep.

Something like a bare bones board or a board designed for micropower is needed.

http://www.home-automation-community.com/arduino-low-power-how-to-run-atmega328p-for-a-year-on-coin-cell-battery/

(*) micropower means very low power (microwatts on average), allowing for unattended battery operation.
If you want micropower(*) operation the Uno is definitely not the board to use as its not micropower and
cannot be configured as such because the USB interface takes constant power whether or not the
microcontroller is in sleep.

Something like a bare bones board or a board designed for micropower is needed.

http://www.home-automation-community.com/arduino-low-power-how-to-run-atmega328p-for-a-year-on-coin-cell-battery/

(*) micropower means very low power (microwatts on average), allowing for unattended battery operation.
Ok thank you i'll look at this tuto and tell yo back why i'm learning

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