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CrossRoads

"If I have arm cortex (leaflabs maples) running on 74Mhz, can this logic analyzer be used?"
Sampling at only a third of the speed tho doesn't help much even if one can store a lot of data.
Just need to be careful about setting up the trigger point you want to start from.

If you're trying to look a long string of serial data going back & forth, then a protocol analyzer is really the way to go.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years. Check out the ATMega1284P based Bobuino and other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  www.crossroadsfencing.com/BobuinoRev17.
Arduino for Teens available at Amazon.com.

aminbahar

Looks good.
http://www.gammon.com.au/forum/?id=10940  What software did you used to draw the circuit? (with lcd etc)

Anyway, now I am confused with which one to go.  =)
For the bitscope, it also can work as the logic analyzer? Isn't it? 
Tell me if I am wrong, as it stated 'n logic'

I am willing to spend $500-900, I would like to have both application. (if possible, the logic,and analog).
How about DSO? (digital signal oscillator?)

Any suggestion/comparison to those analog/ logic kit?

I am looking at http://www.rigolna.com/products/digital-oscilloscopes/ds1000d/  for the digital oscillator. It has both analog and digital channels,  Bandwidth 100Mhz.

What do you guys think? (sorry for asking many question, as quite new with this oscilloscope things.)

aminbahar

Protocol analyzer? that looks like a new thing to look on.
But as for now, I will start from a basic monitoring/ analyzing first.

Might comes in handy if going to experiment the wireless data streaming, packet send/receive.
Thanks for the info anyway. ;)

Nick Gammon


What software did you used to draw the circuit? (with lcd etc)


Photoshop lol. Have to lift my game there.

As for the Rigol, yes it looks tempting. Still I notice the memory depth in "common" mode (whatever that is) is only 8K. I have a scope which has a memory depth of 2.5K. And really, the low memory depth is what makes it fairly useless for analyzing logic.

If you want to spend more than around $150 I would take a look at the EEVblog review of the new Agilent 2000 series...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S62G0F4B1q0

(edit) I didn't really mean to have the show appear in the forum posting - I just posted a link. The forum turned it into an imbedded video.

His other stuff (most of which is very interesting is here):

http://www.eevblog.com/

Dave Jones' basic point is that the new Agilent series are priced very competitively indeed, especially for a "top" brand (rather than a clone). These scopes have a big memory depth, and a mixed-scope option.

I have to admit the sky is really the limit with scopes, and you can spend $10000+ for one with lots of features.

But a word of warning - my digital scope, which was really quite expensive, is useless for analyzing things like SPI because of the memory size. When it only captures 2500 points, hey, that time might elapse while the switch is debouncing! And remember, the higher the speed, the faster those points get gobbled up! Say you are sampling at 50 Mhz. Right, after only one second, you need memory to save 50M points, right? So if you can only capture 8K points, well that is a tiny fraction of a second.

But the good thing that is coming out of this is that you are thinking of the right questions to ask. The right answers is for you to decide, but at least you know what to look for.

aminbahar

Photoshop? hehe. Anyway, it looks good. Wonder if you use any software which can drag and drop like fritzing =p

I think agilent is too expensive for me, and especially for a new starter like me.

My short list would be rigol mixed channel, 100 Mhz: $1000+ , and bitscope.

Anyway, before I made the decision, how's the bitscope?
Do you purchased the network, or usb type? Is it reliable and does it have external interrupt?

CrossRoads

Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years. Check out the ATMega1284P based Bobuino and other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  www.crossroadsfencing.com/BobuinoRev17.
Arduino for Teens available at Amazon.com.

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