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Topic: Which (dip) Switch? (Read 560 times) previous topic - next topic

daitangio

Hi all,
I'd like to buy some basic components at digi-key. They are very cheap, but with a very huge catalog.
I am a newbie.
I am serarching two servos for a robot wheel and some cheap switch.
The switch should be used to turn on-off the arduino robot.
For the servo I think this
http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Detail&name=900-00008-ND
would be grat, but
can you suggest me a good set of switch or dip switches?

Simpson_Jr

I wouldn't use dip-switches for that.
Dip-switches can often be found on (old) PC cards, to change a setting.
They can take some abuse, but they're quite fragile. There's a big chance it won't work any-more after being turned on/off a few thousand times, maybe even less.

A rocker switch or tactile switch would probably be better to turn a project on/off.
It can also handle a lot more power, the cheapest probably is already good enough.

daitangio

Thank you!
So, an on-off push button like this
http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Detail&name=679-1048-ND
would be able to turn on/off my arduino?

Simpson_Jr

Yes, that would be perfect.

You wouldn't really need a Double pole switch for a low voltage DC project, single pole would be enough.

Here you can read about the differences in most switches.
http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/components/switch.htm

The one you've chosen is a dpst. (The picture on the list shows a rocker switch, but internally it works the same)

For $5.57 I would probably search a switch in an old piece of broken electronics... :smiley-roll:

Dip switches do have an advantage over other switches, something I realized after responding, you can easily place one in a breadboard. Most other switches have to be soldered.
Still, built fragile and not capable of handling too much power, I'd rather not use them to turn on/off a complete project.

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