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Topic: I've had it with this BS (Read 3582 times) previous topic - next topic

polishdude20

damn it looks like I really struck a chord with you guys. Well thanks for your thoughts!

Yeah I was thinking of emigrating to another country Italy maybe? Somewhere warm..
But then I remembered I wanted to work for Boeing and be around planes since I'm not allowed to fly them (color blindness).
So what better way to work around planes than to design them!

floresta

Quote
Yeah I was thinking of emigrating to another country Italy maybe? ...
But then I remembered I wanted to work for Boeing
Wouldn't you be emigrating to another country if you went to work for Boeing, or are you going to commute?

Don

CrossRoads

In the US, you can get a pilots license with color blindness by having a Statement of Demonstrated Ability (SODA), as along as you are not totally colorblind.
What you will do is go to an airport and they will shine a "light gun" that you will have to correctly identify the red, green, and white lights. This is important for landings when your radio has gone out, they will shine the lights for to indicate not cleared to land, cleared to land, etc.

In the US, the local FAA office has a local flight doctor (maybe called something else) that has to approve taking of the test. Not sure what Canada's FAA equivalent does.
If you want to get a commercial license, the requirements may be stricter, I never looked into that. But the SODA is sufficient for Private Pilot and for an Instrument rating.


Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

Graynomad

Quote
shine a "light gun" that you will have to correctly identify the red, green, and white lights.

It used to be the same test in Aus for the Army medical. I failed (which in retrospect was probably for the best as I had just been kicked out of school for having issues with discipline and authority :)) So of course being colour blind it was only natural to move into the telecoms field and I got a job wiring the looms in the Townsville exchange (remember those massive wads of wire emanating from the floor that branch off like a mandlebot pattern until you get to single wires, all colour coded of course). They were probably fixing bugs for 30 years until they switched to digital.

So then I moved into another obvious field for a colour blind person, photography. It did cause some issues with product work where the product has to be depicted exactly right. Fortunately that's largely up to the printing process not the photographer. But occasionally I would use an inappropriate background colour.

I then moved back to electronics and had a lot of trouble with resistors, but then that's what multi meters are for right? Thank goodness for SMD, the values are printed on the resistor with numbers, and I do knows me numbers, well up to 8 anyway which is all you need.

To get into the airforce in WW2 my uncle remembered every page of the books they use for testing (with all the coloured dots, normal people see 23, colour blind people see 4 or whatever, he got someone to tell him the correct numbers). The good news is that he got in, the bad news is that he was KIA not long after. Oops.

So the moral of this lengthy post...

Colour blindness doesn't have to hold you back, and

Be careful what you wish for, you may get it.

______
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

polishdude20


Quote
Yeah I was thinking of emigrating to another country Italy maybe? ...
But then I remembered I wanted to work for Boeing
Wouldn't you be emigrating to another country if you went to work for Boeing, or are you going to commute?

Don


yes that's true cause I'm in Canada, and NOWAY am I commuting all the way to Everett from vancouver!  But yes that's true it would be emigrating. BUT  after boeing I'd like to live somewhere else. I want to travel the world.

polishdude20


In the US, you can get a pilots license with color blindness by having a Statement of Demonstrated Ability (SODA), as along as you are not totally colorblind.
What you will do is go to an airport and they will shine a "light gun" that you will have to correctly identify the red, green, and white lights. This is important for landings when your radio has gone out, they will shine the lights for to indicate not cleared to land, cleared to land, etc.

In the US, the local FAA office has a local flight doctor (maybe called something else) that has to approve taking of the test. Not sure what Canada's FAA equivalent does.
If you want to get a commercial license, the requirements may be stricter, I never looked into that. But the SODA is sufficient for Private Pilot and for an Instrument rating.





Yeah I took a dot test at an official medical examiner here in Canada and failed. But... it's not like It ruined my dreams, I realize being a pilot is very expensive and I don't have that money, and repaying it with a student loan is not what I want. Mechanical engineering is my interested field now and Ive already been accepted into a Bachelors of Engineering degree school here in Canada. It's called BCIT (British Columbia Institute of Technology) anyone heard of it?

CrossRoads

Congrats on the school.  Have not heard of it, the only school I know in Canada is McGill University.

You can make out traffic signals? Light gun test is similar.  I can't see majority of the dot tests either. Light gun was not a problem.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

polishdude20


Congrats on the school.  Have not heard of it, the only school I know in Canada is McGill University.

You can make out traffic signals? Light gun test is similar.  I can't see majority of the dot tests either. Light gun was not a problem.


oh yeah that's why i drive! lol but eh I'm not interested in becoming a pilot anymore.

Chuckz


damn it looks like I really struck a chord with you guys. Well thanks for your thoughts!

Yeah I was thinking of emigrating to another country Italy maybe? Somewhere warm..
But then I remembered I wanted to work for Boeing and be around planes since I'm not allowed to fly them (color blindness).
So what better way to work around planes than to design them!


Flying isn't fun anymore.  I know people who have pilot's licenses who are retiring and they said before 9-11 that it wasn't fun anymore.  I've seen very few private planes in the air after 9-11 and I've heard there are a lot of restrictions on sight seeing.  You can be prosecuted for not following the rules and you rent those planes to learn and pay for fuel that was twice as expensive than gas.  You basically pay thousands of dollars for a license that can be taken away from you.  I came close to losing my life up their due to another pilot's stupidity.

Graynomad

Quote
Flying isn't fun anymore

It never was :)

The only vehicle worth getting into is one you can get out of when it breaks.

_____
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

CrossRoads

Flying is a blast. We took a month off summer of 2004 I think and airport hopped across the country & back. Saw a lot of stuff we couldn't have seen trying to make the same trip driving, and stopped at lot of airports the you couldn't get to commercially. Had to do some planning ahead of time, the trip was basically fly 3-3.5 hrs in a morning, then spend a day & a half some where. 55 hours of flying over the course of the month. Would call ahead to the next stop the evening we landed to arrange a car & a room. Land somewhere, lot of places they would pull the car up to the airplane! No terminal lines, no dealing with all the commercial delays.
If  you haven't flown yourself around, you're missing out on a great experience. Go take a few lessons just to try it. Maybe you'll like it, maybe you won't, but ti will always be something you can talk about and I have always found others too afraid to try it themselves will be enamored by your experience.
Pilots are a pretty small percentage of the US population - something like 600,00 total of of us is all.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

polishdude20


Flying is a blast. We took a month off summer of 2004 I think and airport hopped across the country & back. Saw a lot of stuff we couldn't have seen trying to make the same trip driving, and stopped at lot of airports the you couldn't get to commercially. Had to do some planning ahead of time, the trip was basically fly 3-3.5 hrs in a morning, then spend a day & a half some where. 55 hours of flying over the course of the month. Would call ahead to the next stop the evening we landed to arrange a car & a room. Land somewhere, lot of places they would pull the car up to the airplane! No terminal lines, no dealing with all the commercial delays.
If  you haven't flown yourself around, you're missing out on a great experience. Go take a few lessons just to try it. Maybe you'll like it, maybe you won't, but ti will always be something you can talk about and I have always found others too afraid to try it themselves will be enamored by your experience.
Pilots are a pretty small percentage of the US population - something like 600,00 total of of us is all.


your a pilot!? :D Nice

CrossRoads

Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

biocow

Throwing in my 2 cents a bit late... so I'll make it short.

I was severely picked on all through school and my mom would always tell me "Some day they will have to call you Boss." I used to think "Yeah right!" Since graduating High School I've taken just a very few college classes and self-taught myself computers, programming and Linux administration. I now make pretty good money working in the IT department at a credit union. And all though non of those bullies calls me Boss, one of them does work in the branch as a teller which in my opinion is just a small step up from working the counter at McDonalds. Don't get me wrong. I worked as a teller from age 19 to 25, but since I've worked my way up to bigger and better things. Sounds like you will too.
10 PRINT CHR$(7)
20 GOTO 10

polishdude20


Throwing in my 2 cents a bit late... so I'll make it short.

I was severely picked on all through school and my mom would always tell me "Some day they will have to call you Boss." I used to think "Yeah right!" Since graduating High School I've taken just a very few college classes and self-taught myself computers, programming and Linux administration. I now make pretty good money working in the IT department at a credit union. And all though non of those bullies calls me Boss, one of them does work in the branch as a teller which in my opinion is just a small step up from working the counter at McDonalds. Don't get me wrong. I worked as a teller from age 19 to 25, but since I've worked my way up to bigger and better things. Sounds like you will too.

well thanks for sharing  your story! :D

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