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Topic: Can someone please help me out with this college project that's a kid's toy (Read 409 times) previous topic - next topic

lima2502

Summary of the game, there are four seasons to be recognised by sound and light colors. Once the kid recognises the season he/she starts rotating the 4 wheels to combine an outfit suited for the weather. All the correct options are to be placed in one line at a fixed spot.

Hardware:
Eight magnetic sensors (A1302 I also use them as digital input and it works.) placed in a row for each wheel there's two magnets, one upper level and one lower. The magnets on the wheels are placed on two levels lower and upper like the sensors. The upper level has one magnet with n face towards sensor and the other has s face towards sensor, likewise for lower level. There's a DF player for playing the sounds and an addressable LED strip for the lights.

Steps:
1 Randomly generated seasons (4 combinations of light colour and sound, each combination features one light and one sound)

2 If it's the 1st season then say
A 1st wheel's upper sensor detects n face.
B 2nd wheel's lower sensor detects s face.
C 3rd wheel's lower sensor detects north.
D 4th wheel's upper sensor detects south.
[Similar combinations for the other seasons.

3 Green led Color displayed and speaker plays small victory MP3 when required value (correct option) is detected by sensor for each wheel.

4 once all wheels have a green light then the speaker plays final victory MP3

5 random season generated again.

el_supremo

How much are you willing to pay for a project that you should be doing entirely on your own?
When is this assignment due?

Pete
Don't send me technical questions via Private Message.

Delta_G

These kids buy their assignments and then want to whine that their education wasn't worth anything cause they can't get a job.  It's really pitiful. 
|| | ||| | || | ||  ~Woodstock

Please do not PM with technical questions or comments.  Keep Arduino stuff out on the boards where it belongs.

lima2502

Guys just some context, I study product design and this is just a semester project, we never had a course on coding, we are just expected to do it. This is the reason I have come here, if you guys can be a bit nice that would be great.

lima2502

How much are you willing to pay for a project that you should be doing entirely on your own?
When is this assignment due?

Pete
What's the usual charge in such a case, I have never done this before so I do not know the payment expected.

el_supremo

If the course is in product design, are you really expected to magically learn all the details of the hardware and software required to be able to implement it and do that in less than one semester? I doubt that very much.

As far as the money, I don't know what a usual charge would be since I haven't done any paid work here. But I wouldn't strain my brain on anything for less than an absolute minimum of $200US/hr plus expenses.

Pete
Don't send me technical questions via Private Message.

wvmarle

A1302 are analog sensors, so if you use them as digital input you can't distinguish between N, S and none. You can only see that there's a N magnetic face perpendicular to the sensor (the signal goes low). When this moves away the signal is very likely to go high again (the pin hysteresis may or may not keep it low).

Definitely ask your teacher for help with coding, that's what they are for.

This being a now obsoleted sensor and you having a nice image of the thing makes it look very much like it's a ready made piece of hardware, used for many years. Ask your upper class friends for last year's code, much quicker and known to work with your specific hardware.

Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

PaulMurrayCbr

Guys just some context, I study product design and this is just a semester project, we never had a course on coding, we are just expected to do it. This is the reason I have come here, if you guys can be a bit nice that would be great.
So … when you say "product design", this is an engineering course? They showed you what they would like you to build, and your job is to come up with some actual build that can be manufactured? Your job is to work out that - for instance - jamming 32 magnetic sensors and an arduino into this thing is a good way to go (I'm not sure why you wouldn't just use some switches).

Ok, I dig. The question is - is it legit for you to be outsourcing the coding? Could you perhaps tell us the institution you are at and the course id?

The other thing that bugs me is that your description of what you want is worryingly confused. You say "eight sensors placed in a row for each wheel", but in that picture, each wheel looks like it only has two positions at most - why on earth do you need 8? Or perhaps you mean 8 sensors overall, two each for each wheel. But if it's just a matter of working out which one of two positions each wheel is in, what's all this rigmarole about north and south poles? I don't get it - you have a N-facing magnet and an S-facing magnet, but you have two sets of these for each wheel. Why? .. is it that each wheel has four positions, and you use the four N/S combinations of two magnets to identify them? Or, like, the upper layer has a N and a S magnet, the lower also has a N and a S offset at 90 degrees?  Either makes sense … but it took me way more work than it should have done to figure it out from your description.

You say "3 Green led Color displayed" - why three? I see four wheels in that picture you posted. Oh, I see - it's point three of your requirement. Duh, ok. Something lights up and a sound plays.

"Randomly generated seasons (4 combinations of light colour and sound, each combination features one light and one sound)"

What? You have four lights? Four coloured LEDs? You have one LED, and you want it to change colour? Your wheels have colour? The items on the wheels each have their own colour? You have four combinations that your programmer must implement? You have two possible lights and two possible sounds, comprising four combinations? What? What is this? I just don't understand it even a little bit.


No-one will touch this project, man. Anyone who has done any work at all can see long, long hours of trying to interpret complex and confusing requirements with a client who grows increasingly desperate towards deadline, insisting all the while that what they want is "simple" (and implying that the hapless programmer trying to sort out this requirement salad must be stupid). If this course is meant to train you in stating requirements for a programmer, then that's great … but it would be nice of your lecturer to inform me that they have employed me to asses your ability do do so.

Restate your requirments. Use your words. You may discover that once you have clarified exactly what you want this sketch to do, that you can code it up yourself.
http://paulmurraycbr.github.io/ArduinoTheOOWay.html

lima2502


If the course is in product design, are you really expected to magically learn all the details of the hardware and software required to be able to implement it and do that in less than one semester? I doubt that very much.

As far as the money, I don't know what a usual charge would be since I haven't done any paid work here. But I wouldn't strain my brain on anything for less than an absolute minimum of $200US/hr plus expenses.

Pete
If you can't trust me i really don't know what to say. Especially if there's money involved there also needs to be some trust.

lima2502

A1302 are analog sensors, so if you use them as digital input you can't distinguish between N, S and none. You can only see that there's a N magnetic face perpendicular to the sensor (the signal goes low). When this moves away the signal is very likely to go high again (the pin hysteresis may or may not keep it low).

Definitely ask your teacher for help with coding, that's what they are for.

This being a now obsoleted sensor and you having a nice image of the thing makes it look very much like it's a ready made piece of hardware, used for many years. Ask your upper class friends for last year's code, much quicker and known to work with your specific hardware.


Thanks for the advice, will keep that in mind.

wvmarle

One of the very big problems with projects like this is that the developer doesn't have the actual hardware in their hands, making debugging hard. The lack of detailed information on the actual hardware makes it a lot worse. In the embedded world, software and hardware are very closely tied together, and without your full understanding of what the hardware does, what signals come out, what sensors are involved, what outputs are expected there's just no chance to get this done. No matter how good the developer.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

el_supremo

Quote
If you can't trust me
It's nothing to do with trust. I am just expressing my surprise at the situation. I'd be just as surprised if you said that you were an English major and you had to write a 100 page critique of Shakespeare's Hamlet in fluent Mandarin.

Pete
Don't send me technical questions via Private Message.

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