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Topic: Can you identify what is in this picture? (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

James C4S

Post your guesses on what this is:



Hint:  The diameter of each is about 1 inch.
Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com

Simpson_Jr


logic

-Ed
Felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas.

cr0sh


Plutonium. What do I win? :)


Heh - what tipped you off?

http://chemistry.about.com/od/periodictableelements/ig/Element-Photo-Gallery.--98/Plutonium.-iQv.htm

My best guess was "solder", to be honest...

:)
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

Valalvax

I was on the same track, I thought maybe mercury, but it was too uneven/rugged

neurostar


Graynomad

Melted aluminium (or should that be aluminum?)

_____
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

James C4S

That was way faster than my Facebook friends.  It is Plutonium. 
Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com

westfw

And you're supposed to be able to distinguish a B&W photograph of plutonium from a B&W photograph of nearly any other metal in similarly sized blobs using exactly which clues?  And how do you KNOW it's plutonium, anyway?

It reminds me of The Wooden Periodic Table of the Elements, which is really cool, but all the metals look pretty much alike...

GaryP

The only law for me; Ohms Law: U=R*I       P=U*I
Note to self: "Damn! Why don't you just fix it!!!"

logic

Heh - what tipped you off?
I probably would have gone with buttons or something like mercury, but then I checked the Internet to see if this wasn't a trick question. ;)

And that periodic "table" is fantastic! I love that he's wasn't deterred at all by the prospect of storing the radioactive samples either. :D You're not exactly going to be using that as an everyday reference, so it doesn't matter much if you can't immediately identify the types of wood. I don't dare show that to my wife, she'd insist I start construction immediately. ;)
-Ed
Felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas.

westfw

Quote
The rumor is that those pellets (20mm diameter, 20mm long) are the active elements of the fuel rods in many utility power generation reactors


Eh?  Nonsense.  First of all those (the pictures) aren't 20mm long, and they're not "pellets."  They're "typical" globs of the shape created by surface tension when you let some liquid metal solidify on a flat surface (my guess would have been solder, too...)

Second, there are no reactor designs that use metallic (pure) plutonium, and few reactors that use plutonium as a fuel at all (Japan seems to have some reactors, including the troubled ones, based on MOX fuel rods - Mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium.)  Most of the plutonium in the average reactor is a waste product produced when (non-fissile) U238 absorbs neutrons, and this requires a lot of additional processing to be concentrated enough to be useful as fuel.

James C4S

Maybe I should have added, I found the picture on the Wikipedia article on Plutonium.

The recent events in Japan made me curious on the subject and I was surprised to see what Pu looks like. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plutonium
Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com

GaryP

Do you think that this kind of topic is in the right place anyway? And you have borrowed an image without permission from other web-site, that is a bad behaviour...
:smiley-roll-blue:

Kari
The only law for me; Ohms Law: U=R*I       P=U*I
Note to self: "Damn! Why don't you just fix it!!!"

Simpson_Jr


Plutonium. What do I win? :)


He seems to have two,  maybe you'll get one if you're eh... not lucky. ]:D

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