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Author Topic: Software used to produce this (see topic) picture.  (Read 1808 times)
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Hello there.

What is the software that produces this image:

[size=24]?[/size]

Thanks in advance.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2010, 01:00:14 pm by 2stl » Logged

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Fritzing, I believe...
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Nice try.

However, fritzing doesn't render these smooth wires. smiley

Thanks.
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I am pretty sure its not fritzing, unless it was an older copy; fritzing usually uses images for the parts on the breadboard, so the breadboard view looks like a real breadboard with real parts (well, usually).

I think this was done with some other software - but what, I don't know...

 smiley
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A better question is why you want to know...? I am not sure that using a breadboard diagram to hook things up (for future reference or to show others) is necessarily a good thing (unless perhaps geared toward extreme first-timers).

It is better to get used to (and teach, if that is the point) the relationship between real parts (on a breadboard or PCB) and their relationships to a standard schematic diagram - as early and quickly as possible...

 smiley
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extreme first-timer
It's me!  ;D

I just want to know what is the software because this style of visualization is much better to understand imho. I don't plan to use the software as a substitute for real-life, but I don't want to risk my Arduino, so, at least for the firs tests, i'm gonna use a software and study very carefully every part of the scheme to avoid possible damage.

Thank you.

PS: The frietzing wires rendering (poly-shaped) is not only boring, but also very confusing when lots of wires are near. (ihmo)
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It's me!  

I just want to know what is the software because this style of visualization is much better to understand imho. I don't plan to use the software as a substitute for real-life, but I don't want to risk my Arduino, so, at least for the firs tests, i'm gonna use a software and study very carefully every part of the scheme to avoid possible damage.

If a schematic or assembly diagram is displayed or drawn incorrectly, assembling it the same way won't prevent damage.

You need to learn to understand and visualize how a standard schematic relates to the assembly on your breadboard or on a real PCB. Not only that, but you need to know how to read a schematic to be able to assemble it on a board, as well as how to understand how and why parts are connected in the schematic (and their values) - to understand if a particular schematic handed to you is valid and will work, or will just completely fail (sometime spectacularly!).

A wiring diagram or assembly diagram can help, but recognize them for the training wheels they are, and learn to ride that bike properly, as quickly as you can!

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Thank you.

PS: The frietzing wires rendering (poly-shaped) is not only boring, but also very confusing when lots of wires are near. (ihmo)

I think anything that shows a real physical layout is, in the end, going to ultimately look like a "rats nest" after a certain level of complexity. This includes even a PCB view; fortunately those can be set up to only display certain layers as needed, so it isn't so cluttered.

Fritzing's layout was probably chose to route as it does because normal jumpers for breadboards are straight wires (that are not supposed to be bent, period). It is possible to make a very dense board with many parallel "bus" lines, that is very easy to follow - provided one uses the same color of wires for the jumpers, color coding everything, in fact - along with proper layout (and leaving plenty of space - so many people cram way too much on a single breadboard, instead of spending the money on extra breadboards). Really, the flexible wire jumpers you see out there, while useful, seem to sometimes only serve to create more severe "rat's nest" wiring, thus causing further confusion.

 smiley

/then there's wire-wrap...
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Wow! Many thanks for your massive explanation!

I don't know if it's easy to accidentally damage an Arduino, at least in my mind, taking extra care on power circuit is enough, however, as a noob, i have many doubts and am not completely sure.

I still want to know the software though... isn't simply curiosity reason enough? smiley
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/then there's wire-wrap...
Mowcius quietly dies.
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I still want to know the software though... isn't simply curiosity reason enough?
It is. Where did you get the picture? That might provide a clue. I don't recognize it. I've never seen another picture like it.
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I still want to know the software though... isn't simply curiosity reason enough?

Certainly! I would be interested as well, though I would likely never use such software (I would, however, use something like in Fritzing, where I could prototype a design on breadboard, then put the parts over onto fritzing's breadboard, and it would keep the netlist for the schematic, then to PCB - but then again, one should build the prototype on the breadboard from a prototype schematic - I just tend to hack something together on a breadboard first from basic schematics, then draw a real schematic, and update from there - probably a bad workflow, actually).

Just realize that while it helps you, eventually the training wheels need to come off...

 smiley

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Mowcius quietly dies.


Done properly, wirewrap can actually be a nice thing; the problem is learning to do it properly. I read a tutorial on this once, which involved wrapping the layers such that, for any pin with more than two levels, you would only need to take off a set of levels of some low number to reach the level you wanted.

Wire-wrap has its uses - it is a much stronger mechanical joint than soldering, for instance...

The "worst" rats-nest I have seen of wire-wrap (which probably isn't the absolute worst - I am sure some of the old transistor and older computers that used wire-wrap were real nightmares) was of something called the "CoCo 3 Prototype" - this was a wire-wrapped monster of a Tandy Color Computer 3 used by Microware to (supposedly) develop OS-9 Level II for the CoCo 3 back in the mid-1980s:

This is one side of it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:CoCo3Prototype.jpg

I can't find images of the backside, but let's just say its a mess; by the way, that board above is pretty large - it also doesn't have on it a chip that is on the CoCo called the GIME; this chip was a "proprietary" chip, and no more exist - it is thought that the GIME was implemented on this board using discrete logic ICs and/or custom programmed PALs or other such devices (before it was ultimately commited to fabbing as an IC). This was the way things were done back then...

 smiley
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It is. Where did you get the picture? That might provide a clue. I don't recognize it. I've never seen another picture like it.
It's from the ShiftOut tutorial page.

Yeah I have done wirewrap once but it's never really appealed apart from the novelty of doing it. PCBs aren't too hard to make/buy now.

Mowcius
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I like wirewrap and I personally think that everyone that deals with electronics should have at least a cheap hand tool (like my 4$ radio shack model)

if nothing else, like I showed my wife, it makes connecting ribbon cable to a header a 2min task

and its great for basic proto designs or more long term situations like my 1024 led matrix

and yes the PCB argument, I dont like chemicals in my 2 bedroom apartment, especially ones that stain everything it touches, when I get a house (hopefully within the next year or 2) then I will have a proper workspace
« Last Edit: August 18, 2010, 03:42:28 pm by Osgeld » Logged


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like my 1024 led matrix

I was about to post a picture of that when I read all this discussion about wirewrap ;D.

I prefer PCBs because I'm in a house with outside shed storage.  I use Cupric Chloride in an aqueous Hydrochloric Acid solution smiley-wink.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2010, 05:27:18 pm by Tchnclfl » Logged

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Previous discussion of these vector illustrations here http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1225769108 and here http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1192447197

Andrew
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