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Topic: Arduino Engineering (Read 589 times) previous topic - next topic

BackProp36

Hi there! I teach a class in electronics engineering and a pre-Electrical engineering course. I just wanted to know, because a lot of my students ask about the Arduino. What's the learning scope to this, I've looked into this and it seems that it's all laid out for you and only Dupont wiring is there to work with, and it's all explained. I think it's a cool idea for younger people to learn, and something for Home automation. But is there really a good learning experience if everything is posted online and all the code is there? Yes, libraries make it easier to work with but I like to challenge my students so they can have fun and learn. Thanks guys!

Robin2

But is there really a good learning experience if everything is posted online and all the code is there?
That's like saying someone should not bother with a creative writing course because all the words are in a dictionary.

The purpose of the Arduino system is to make it easy to get started with microprocessors. Once you have grasped the basics the opportunities to do stuff are limitless.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

pert

In theory, you can buy an Arduino, slap a shield on it, upload some prewritten code, and you have a project without really knowing what you did. We often meet the people who try that here because, even though Arduino tries to make everything very beginner-friendly, it's still easy to mess something up. That's when the people trying to slide through without understanding anything hit a wall.

It should be possible for you to make sure your students are not just copy-pasting their way around learning. I think that's only really difficult for teachers who don't have any knowledge in this field. If you don't like libraries then just tell them they're not allowed. There are also the Arduino core libraries that are automatically included in every sketch. These contain all the standard Arduino API functions like digitalWrite, etc. If you don't even want that available to the students, it's possible to prevent it. The library is only included in .ino files so if they write their code in .h, .cpp, etc files then it's no problem. If you want to disable it in .ino files also you can do it like this:
Code: [Select]
#if false
#include <Arduino.h>
#endif

The sketch preprocessor only adds the #include directive for Arduino.h if the sketch doesn't already have one but the #if directive makes it so the file is not included.

BackProp36

That's like saying someone should not bother with a creative writing course because all the words are in a dictionary.

The purpose of the Arduino system is to make it easy to get started with microprocessors. Once you have grasped the basics the opportunities to do stuff are limitless.

...R
Right, but the analogy is not really the same, there's a difference between copying code and real world languages. But regarding your other statement, I see what you mean thanks.

Robin2

Right, but the analogy is not really the same, there's a difference between copying code and real world languages.
Analogies are intended to be illustrative, not to be taken literally

I any case, what about plagiarism?  :)

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

v_chinnici

Have you considered looking into the Arduino Engineering Kit at all?

Maybe this product could be a good fit for your classroom and it also includes all the teaching materials.

Best regards,
Valentina Chinnici
Arduino
Product Marketing Manager (Education)

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