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Author Topic: Arduino Controlled Dehumidifer  (Read 468 times)
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I am trying to build a dehumidifier for collecting water from air. The goal of this project is to produce at least 50ml of water in 8 hours under extreme and varying conditions, using < 10A of current and 12 V of DC power that is extremely durable.

The extreme conditions I speak of would be -60 degrees and 10% humidity, however I will really take what I can get (as I realise this may be quite a stretch).

So far I have got the following materials:
158W Peltier Element
Noctua NH4-D14
Arctic Silver Thermal Compound
Generic Lab Power Supply

I am looking for:
Solid State Relay for DC rated for 20A and 15V.

Putting this altogether and running it at 12V makes the surface of the Peltier go to -6 degrees. It quickly collects condensation however before it can run off into the collection vessel it freezes, even if it is hung upside down or sideways. So at the moment I am really looking for a way to prevent my water from freezing before it runs off.

Woud like to hear your thoughts.
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use pwm to keep the temperature a hair above the freezing point. a pid loop with a temperature sensor could manage it. also, i think an ssr would not be the right tool for the job. a good logic level mosfet might be more appropriate for switching.
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Quote
use pwm to keep the temperature a hair above the freezing point.

Problem is what if the ambient temperature is below freezing point? Wouldn't I need a colder surface than ambient to collect condensation in all cases? Also I would rather stay away from playing with temperature sensors and voltage regulators, seems like swatting a fly with a shotgun.

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also, i think an ssr would not be the right tool for the job. a good logic level mosfet might be more appropriate for switching.

Why do you say that?
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