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Arlington, MA, USA
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My original project plan called for WiFi connectivity with an AsyncLabs YellowJacket or BlackWidow. But as they were unavailable, I bought an Ethernet shield. Then AsyncLabs announced that they were shutting down, and all my preferred WiFi solutions were no longer available. So I now have the thing working on Ethernet, and I see that LinkSprite is now offering a product (CuHead) that they claim is compatible with the AsyncLabs shield software. My questions are:

1. What have people's experiences with the CuHead been? Good, bad, otherwise? Is it completely compatible?
2. How much work is it to go from Ethernet to WiFi?
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I ran into the same problem as well, I bought a Linksprite CuHead WifiShield but I have no idea how to make it work. I tried to use the code that was provided but all the configuration encoding are in hex and I must have messed it up cause I was not able to connect to my network. I double checked it by verifying that the MAC address of the shield was not in the list of devices on my router.

Is there a simpler way to get it to work with the WiShield libraries? Documentation on the Linksprite shield is rather thin and there doesn't seem to be many people using the shield.

Help anyone?
« Last Edit: April 15, 2011, 02:18:47 am by uretroublesome » Logged

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More details regarding CuHead Wifi Shield, it is a Microchip based shield so according to linksprite1 @ http://forum.linksprite.com/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=152&sid=7c2eb59cfff04205ff5f87763634406d



Out of Box Setup (from Asynclab.com)

Postby linksprite1 » Sun Apr 03, 2011 10:53 pm
Download the software and put it into the right directory as described in the Software section above.
Plug the WiShield into the Arduino board. Leave jumpers in default positions. The LED jumper (JP3) connected and the interrupt jumper (JP2) configured to use the INT0 pin.
Restart the Arduino IDE to build the library and open the WebServer sketch from File->Sketchbook->Examples->Library->WiShield.
The next step involves setting up the wireless configuration parameters like SSID and security for your wireless network. These parameters are defined at the top of the WebServer sketch.
Find out the SSID of your wireless AP/router. You can get it by looking at the configuration setting of the wireless connection on laptop or by logging into you AP/router's config page.
You need to figure out a good IP address to use for your WiShield. For this, you will have to find out the subnet mask and IP address range that your network uses. This can be found on a PC by right-clicking on the network connection icon at the bottom right corner of the taskbar and selecting 'Status'. Click on the Support tab. It might look something like,
IP address : 192.168.1.100
Subnet mask : 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 192.168.1.1
We are only interested in getting a good IP address. What the subnet mask specifies is the network address. In the above case, the network address is 192.168.1.xxx and therefore all devices on this network will have IP addresses starting with '192.168.1'. This might be different for your AP. Since the current WiShield does not have support for DHCP you will have to select an IP address starting with this subnet mask. Just make sure you select something that is not used by any other device on your network.
Change the local_ip variable in the sketch to your selected IP address. Change the ssid variable to your network SSID.
The next step is to setup the right security options. The WiShield supports open (no security), WEP, WPA/TKIP-PSK, WPA2/AES-PSK. You might have to look at you AP/router configuration page to get this information unless you already know it. Change the security_type variable to select the appropriate security type. Depending on your security_type selection, you will now have to modify the security_passphrase/wep_keys variable to match you network settings.
The sketch configures WiShield to connect to the AP (infrastructure mode) by default.
The webpage[] array holds the webpage that this WebServer will serve up when requested.
You are now all set to power up the WiShield. Compile the sketch and load it into the Arduino board.
The red LED indicates connection status. Wait for the LED to turn on. The amount of time required to connect to the network varies depending on the security_type setting. If you selected open/WEP it should take 3/4 seconds to connect. If you selected WPA/WPA2, it takes slightly more than 30 seconds as the WiFi device needs to calculate the PSK from the passphrase for use in the security handshake.
Once the red LED turns on, you are ready to talk to the device.
You can try pinging the device by starting a terminal and typing,
$ ping <IP address of WiShield>
For example, $ ping 192.168.1.2 and you should see the WiShield respond to these ping requests
If successful, fire up a browser and enter for example, http://192.168.1.2 and you should see the webpage displayed in your browser window.
Now you are all set to be creative and come up with some interesting applications with the WiShield

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Those instructions are straight out of the box setup from asynclab.com, but no luck for me so far.
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Arlington, MA, USA
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Well, it doesn't sound trivial anyway. Anyone else out there using this shield?
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Not that shield specifically, but I've done a bunch with the Wishield.  I've also done a bunch of code with the hard wired ethernet shield.  There are a number of difference between the Wishield library and the hardwired one.  The Wishield uses callbacks to handle interaction and the ethernet shield is more directly inline.  The Wishield is interrupt driven while the other is not.  The Wishield handles a lot of the standard interaction for you while the hardwired one does not.  The Wishield takes more memory than the 'official' one, it's on a par with the ENC28J60.

They both work pretty well, just differently.

If you want to find out how hard it will be to make the wifi shield work you're welcome to take a look at the code I posted on my site for a couple of projects to see the differences.  I have at least one of each showing there.  If you have a specific question on them I may be able to help, but I haven't tried the shield you mentioned.  For me it's too much money for an experiment just to find out. 
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Thanks, draythomp. If the claims are correct, the board should be a plugin replacement for the WiShield, and that certainly wouldn't be hard given that AsyncLabs documented everything. I'd just like to hear from an actual user of the LinkSprite implementation, because their other wifi shield looked like a PITA to use. It would be nice if there were a standard programming interface for all the ethernet/wifi shields. I've gotten comfortable with the official Ethernet one, esp. with the addition of DHCP/DNS support. But my device desperately wants to be wireless :-)

I looked around your site a bit (cool stuff you're doing! Makes me wish I had more time...), but couldn't immediately find the sketches that would be relevant. Any chance you'd be willing to link to a relevant blog posting?
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A wired ethernet implementation is at: http://draythomp.blogspot.com/p/house-clock.html and a wifi example is at http://draythomp.blogspot.com/p/test-html-code.html.  They do different things, but basically are the same for web services so you can compare them to see the differences.

I've changed both of them to add an XBee broadcasting the power usage and time, and the latest sketch is not posted.  The differences between the old sketchs and the new ones are minimal though.
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What exact issue do you have? You can post questions at http://forum.linksprite.com/viewforum.php?f=15
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Can anybody please tell me why the LED on my cuhead wifishield is green? I never see a red LED on the shield.
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My original project plan called for WiFi connectivity with an AsyncLabs YellowJacket or BlackWidow. But as they were unavailable, I bought an Ethernet shield. Then AsyncLabs announced that they were shutting down, and all my preferred WiFi solutions were no longer available. So I now have the thing working on Ethernet, and I see that LinkSprite is now offering a product (CuHead) that they claim is compatible with the AsyncLabs shield software. My questions are:

1. What have people's experiences with the CuHead been? Good, bad, otherwise? Is it completely compatible?
2. How much work is it to go from Ethernet to WiFi?

I can't answer 1 directly, but if you are open to using other solutions, you can just get a WR703N TP-Link wifi mini router (for around $20)  and connect to your ethernet shield. Using this solution, the answer to question 2 is 0 work.
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I second that statement. However, I'd like to point out that the 703 only comes with a Chinese web interface and there is no firmware available with a different language from the manufacturer.

You could install an OpenWrt on it though.

For sake of simplicity I'd suggest a 702 or a 3020 which in the US are sold with a English Web UI. The 3020 is similar in hardware to the 703 and also can be flashed with OpenWrt, the 702 cannot.

However, if you do get a 703 I've managed to translate the menu points necessary to reconfigure it with the help of Google translate. Not something I'd attempt for frequent reconfiguration ;-)
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