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Topic: Thinking about starting an Arduino magazine (Read 3310 times) previous topic - next topic

doublet

This idea has been stuck in my mind for some months: an Arduino magazine? Why not?
But... Why start a magazine while there are so many blogs, so many project sites and wikipedia who knows everything? It would be aimed towards beginners. Like, every issue, another part or shield is presented, and how to use it, ... You wouldn't only get a pile of electronics if you buy that certain piece after a while, but also the knowledge to use them. Of course that wouldn't be all, stuff like projects in detail (how exactly it's made, how it's works, ...), making a project with a walk through the steps of designing the code and hardware, explanations of, for example, the differences between some programming languages or a description of the differences of Creative Commons licenses, ...

So, in short, I'm looking for opinions and other ideas :)
Sorry God members, I'm an atheist.

Onions

Wow, brilliant idea! Will you deliver to the UK  :D ? You said it was aimed at beginners, but there is no reason why it could not have more advanced things in it. Why not have a section like the exhibition/gallery, where people can show off their arduino creations? Maybe a project of the month prize? Arduino related news section?

Even with so many websites on arduino and electronics, there are still plenty of books about the subjects. There is something good about having it on paper... An arduino magazine would definately appeal to me, and I'm sure it would appeal to others as well.

Onions.
My website: http://www.harryrabbit.co.uk/electronics/home.html Up and running now! (Feel free to look round!) :D

doublet


Wow, brilliant idea! Will you deliver to the UK  :D ?

I'll deliver to the internetz: completely free pdf, print-it-yourself (to stay in the DIY theme :D)

You said it was aimed at beginners, but there is no reason why it could not have more advanced things in it. Why not have a section like the exhibition/gallery, where people can show off their arduino creations? Maybe a project of the month prize? Arduino related news section?

Maybe some sponsored ads from sparkfun or digikey or so (e.g. 'You can buy a kit with everything you need to do this project from sparkfun.com/qsdf/qsdf') with €1 profit / kit or so and then use it to fund prizes and stuff?


Why not have a section like the exhibition/gallery, where people can show off their arduino creations?

The projects should have good documentation, so everybody can build them easily. Maybe sell kits through e-shops, like I said above.

Totally exited!/size]
Sorry God members, I'm an atheist.

Valalvax

How bout this

60 pages


1-20: Beginner level stuff

21-40: Intermediate stuff

41-60: Advanced stuff


Too much material is focused on the absolute beginner (which isn't a bad thing, don't get me wrong, but I'm at an intermediate level and find it hard to find things that are my level)

Grumpy_Mike

#4
May 09, 2011, 11:27 pm Last Edit: May 10, 2011, 10:53 am by Grumpy_Mike Reason: 1
Quote
[I'm at an intermediate level and find it hard to find things that are my level

That is where my stuff is aimed  :)

How about an Arduino podcast, that is something I have been considering for some time.

Valalvax

#5
May 10, 2011, 05:21 am Last Edit: May 10, 2011, 05:24 am by Valalvax Reason: 1
See, Mike, that's where you put a link to your stuff, I'm lazy, do all the work for me :P


Congrats, when I typed your name Google suggested I add Arduino to it


By the way, your last name is odd... Mr. Arduino (Facebook)

(scrolling a few more results down... apparently there are actually people named Arduino... I found a guy (who very well could have been the same guy)'s obituary listing :(

CowJam


This idea has been stuck in my mind for some months: an Arduino magazine? Why not?
But... Why start a magazine while there are so many blogs, so many project sites and wikipedia who knows everything? It would be aimed towards beginners. Like, every issue, another part or shield is presented, and how to use it, ... You wouldn't only get a pile of electronics if you buy that certain piece after a while, but also the knowledge to use them. Of course that wouldn't be all, stuff like projects in detail (how exactly it's made, how it's works, ...), making a project with a walk through the steps of designing the code and hardware, explanations of, for example, the differences between some programming languages or a description of the differences of Creative Commons licenses, ...

So, in short, I'm looking for opinions and other ideas :)


It's crossed my mind before.  There's no need to keep it for beginners.  There is a lot of stuff online but it'd be really nice to have something pulling it all together.

You'd want to include news, reviews, letters, readers wives projects (you'd probably want some web space to host decent instructions for all projects included, this may be better than filling the mag with it), how-tos, theory, that kind of thing.

I'd pay for it if you publish it as an eBook through the kindle store.

Grumpy_Mike


mowcius

If I was being meanI'd say it's called Hackaday and Make Magazine :D

I have also considered it a few times before.

Onions

How about user contributed material? Any of the readers can write an article to be placed in the magazine, should they want to. To keep spammers out, it would need to be checked over by the editor first, but it could serve as an announcement page. Basically, like the playground, only on paper.

Onions.
My website: http://www.harryrabbit.co.uk/electronics/home.html Up and running now! (Feel free to look round!) :D

doublet


How about user contributed material? Any of the readers can write an article to be placed in the magazine, should they want to. To keep spammers out, it would need to be checked over by the editor first, but it could serve as an announcement page. Basically, like the playground, only on paper.

I certainly will not be able to do all this alone.

You'd want to include news, reviews, letters, readers wives projects (you'd probably want some web space to host decent instructions for all projects included, this may be better than filling the mag with it), how-tos, theory, that kind of thing.

I'd pay for it if you publish it as an eBook through the kindle store.

Well, if people appreciate it the magazine, I would start a YouTube channel, and the next step would be a website with forums, tutorials, ...
Sorry God members, I'm an atheist.

cr0sh


This idea has been stuck in my mind for some months: an Arduino magazine? Why not?

So, in short, I'm looking for opinions and other ideas :)


I assume you are sitting on a pile of money, and its burning a hole in your pocket?

The truth is, starting a magazine is hard and expensive work; have you done your research as to your target market, how many of them purchase magazine subscriptions, which ones they currently subscribe to, etc?

Do you know about your competion? You have Make, Nuts and Volts, Servo, and several others to consider; no, none of these are focused on the Arduino exclusively (or at all), but they -are- your competition, so you need to keep them in mind - mainly as to what makes them successful, how do they draw in the readers, how can you compete with them, etc.

These days, you also need to build a community around your magazine, and that means social networking and a good website. This costs money - quite a bit of money. You're probably looking at around $20K USD for the website development (complete package, actual development company, plus the marketing, etc) alone.

I'm not saying it isn't possible, nor that it isn't a good idea (I'm kinda surprised it hasn't been done yet, in all the years the Arduino has been around - makes you kinda wonder "why?" - you should look into that) - but there does need to be a reality check.

I don't think it would be worth trying unless you had about $100,000 USD to kick it off - that would be "to do it right" (ie, getting an office, hiring staff, building the website, marketing, etc). Even then, it could be a crapshoot...

Good luck with the project; I'd probably subscribe myself (or at least pick up an issue - I don't consider myself a beginner, per se, but I would be interested in such a magazine).

:)
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

Onions

Quote
You're probably looking at around $20K USD for the website development (complete package, actual development company, plus the marketing, etc) alone.


$20,000 !? I built my website using HTML, and it did not cost a penny. If you get to grips with basic HTML, you can easily put together a website. After that, you will need to consider hosting it. If you already have a website, you cna add it on to that. Otherwise, you will need to buy a domain name and server space (unless you make an arduino web server). 1-2-3 reg seems a common web hosting company, so have a look round there to get an idea about prices.
As cr0sh said, professional web development would not be cheap. On the other hand, homebrew websites are.

Onions.
My website: http://www.harryrabbit.co.uk/electronics/home.html Up and running now! (Feel free to look round!) :D

doublet



This idea has been stuck in my mind for some months: an Arduino magazine? Why not?

So, in short, I'm looking for opinions and other ideas :)


I assume you are sitting on a pile of money, and its burning a hole in your pocket?

The truth is, starting a magazine is hard and expensive work; have you done your research as to your target market, how many of them purchase magazine subscriptions, which ones they currently subscribe to, etc?

Do you know about your competion? You have Make, Nuts and Volts, Servo, and several others to consider; no, none of these are focused on the Arduino exclusively (or at all), but they -are- your competition, so you need to keep them in mind - mainly as to what makes them successful, how do they draw in the readers, how can you compete with them, etc.

These days, you also need to build a community around your magazine, and that means social networking and a good website. This costs money - quite a bit of money. You're probably looking at around $20K USD for the website development (complete package, actual development company, plus the marketing, etc) alone.

I'm not saying it isn't possible, nor that it isn't a good idea (I'm kinda surprised it hasn't been done yet, in all the years the Arduino has been around - makes you kinda wonder "why?" - you should look into that) - but there does need to be a reality check.

I don't think it would be worth trying unless you had about $100,000 USD to kick it off - that would be "to do it right" (ie, getting an office, hiring staff, building the website, marketing, etc). Even then, it could be a crapshoot...

Good luck with the project; I'd probably subscribe myself (or at least pick up an issue - I don't consider myself a beginner, per se, but I would be interested in such a magazine).

:)

You get me wrong - I know there are much others out there. But I want to make a free, downloadable, community-made magazine. Not really like a magazine, but more like, ehm, let's call it an e-magazine :)



Quote
You're probably looking at around $20K USD for the website development (complete package, actual development company, plus the marketing, etc) alone.


$20,000 !? I built my website using HTML, and it did not cost a penny. If you get to grips with basic HTML, you can easily put together a website. After that, you will need to consider hosting it. If you already have a website, you cna add it on to that. Otherwise, you will need to buy a domain name and server space (unless you make an arduino web server). 1-2-3 reg seems a common web hosting company, so have a look round there to get an idea about prices.
As cr0sh said, professional web development would not be cheap. On the other hand, homebrew websites are.

Onions.

You're talking about static websites. As a hobby PHP developer, I must admit cr0sh is right. My dad is setting up a webshop, and the company that is going to build it asks €6.500.
For a system that I am aiming to, $20.000 seems reasonable. However, as I don't have that much money, I'll develop it myself (I have already written some classes of it, just to maintain my PHP skills).
Sorry God members, I'm an atheist.

cr0sh


As cr0sh said, professional web development would not be cheap. On the other hand, homebrew websites are.


But you won't be able to market a real magazine on a shoe-string website - it just doesn't work that way. Honestly, my numbers are probably low - and really, $20K for a website isn't that much, when you really start thinking about it. Remember, the website isn't just a brochure - it's a marketing vehicle. You want it to look slick, you want it to function well. You might want to integrate your subscription and billing systems with it. You probably want to link it into facebook and twitter. You're going to need some flash elements. Proper layout and graphic design will be a must. Back end management and reporting, with a well designed database solution to run it all.

If you attempt to start small and shoestring, and go large - somebody else out there with the money will come in, drop the dough, and scoop you before your readerbase is even established. Seriously, how difficult do you think it would be for Oreilly to implement "Make: Arduino"? They already have the website, and they have the money and user-base; all they likely would need to do is some graphic design, drop a template on their backend, and be rolling in a month or two.

But they might be waiting for some other chump to test the waters first...let someone else burn some cash to do -your- market research.

That's reality.

:)
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

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