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Author Topic: Voltage regulator question  (Read 1054 times)
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Several things spring to mind.
1) You have no capacitors on the input nor output of the regulators. This is needed to keep them stable.
2) You are driving high power LEDs with a simple current limiting resistor. This is defiantly not a good idea.
3) If something sticks on when turned off with a signal but is off to begin with it could be:-
    a) You haven't declared those pins to be outputs in the setup() function.
    b) A ground path is missing.
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I am driving the LED's with both a regulator and resistors. I'm not sure what I could do to be safer than that. I definitely declared it because I just do a for loop in the setup to initialize all of the pins I use so it must be the ground connection is broken. Ill check that as soon as I set up all my stuff again. Thanks for the advice Ill let you know if it helps
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I'm not sure what I could do to be safer than that
Lots of things.
You are driving it with a constant voltage regulator using a very low value of resistor to turn it into a constant current supply. This is not good. You need to use a constant current regulator so that the current stays the same as the voltage drop across the LED changes due to ageing, and temperature changes.
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