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Topic: UNO FCC certification (Read 3 times) previous topic - next topic

Tim Williams

As far as I can tell the offical word is "pending FCC certification." http://arduino.cc/blog/2010/09/24/dinner-is-ready/

My understanding is that any residential product that could potentially emit RF interference (digital clock above 9KHz) needs to certified (and assigned an FCC ID) or verified (no FCC ID required). Which depends on what type of device it is.

So, is the Arduino a 'CPU Board' as defined by the FCC. If so, it should be certified (and assigned an FCC ID) prior to marketing. If it is an 'other class B digital device' then it needs verification.

Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, nor do I play one on TV.

Grumpy_Mike

#6
Nov 09, 2010, 03:01 pm Last Edit: Nov 09, 2010, 03:03 pm by Grumpy_Mike Reason: 1
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i have contacted my supplier.

That response from your supplier is not sufficient and he is in breach of the law with that reply.
@Tim
As I said no FCC ID is required for an unintentional emitter, that is something that is not designed to emit EM radiation and only emits it as an unintentional consequence of the design. So for example an Xbee is meant to emit radio waves, and arduino is not. The A or B classification is determined by the size of the emissions.

I saw a Video of the UNO launch in which Massimo said it had been FCC tested. The suppler MUST be able to supply you with a certificate.

Tim Williams

#7
Nov 09, 2010, 09:53 pm Last Edit: Nov 09, 2010, 09:56 pm by timmyw Reason: 1
Everything under FCC part 15 subpart B is an unintentional emitter (intentional emitters are covered under FCC part 15 subpart C). Scanners and radar detectors are two examples of part 15-B unitentional emitters that do require certification and thus an FCC ID.

Class A and class B have differing radiation and conduction limits, the definition is based on industrial or residential use not on emissions.

From FCC part 15.3:
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(h) Class A digital device. A digital device that is marketed for use in a commercial, industrial or business environment, exclusive of a device which is marketed for use by the general public or is intended to be used in the home.

(i) Class B digital device. A digital device that is marketed for use in a residential environment notwithstanding use in commercial, business and industrial environments. Examples of such devices include, but are not limited to, personal computers, calculators, and similar electronic devices that are marketed for use by the general public.


Disclaimer: I haven't passed the bar since my last post, so I am still not a lawyer.

Grumpy_Mike

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the definition is based on industrial or residential use not on emissions.

Yes that's what they say officially but normally you have a choice of A or B with a lot of equipment. At least that is what they offered me every time I have had something FCC approved.

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Scanners and radar detectors are two examples of part 15-B unitentional emitters that do require certification and thus an FCC ID.

That's a new one on me. Mind you they are always changing the rules, it's just basically an import blocking measure dressed up with some fancy conditions.


SeanJ

Arduino Uno has FCC logo on it; so I assume it's FCC compliant.
http://www.robotsimple.com/Arduino_Uno

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