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Topic: Help with creating a synth (Read 543 times) previous topic - next topic

grahamcrackeh

I am relatively new to electronics and I want to make an analog synth controlled digitally by an arduino.  But before I really get started, I would like to see if anyone could help me comprehend this circuit and help me understand the use of the op amp.  http://www.falstad.com/circuit/e-triangle.html

James C4S

There is a detailed description of the circuit on that page.  What are you not understanding?

More information on the Op Amp can be found here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operational_amplifier
and
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operational_amplifier_applications
Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com

grahamcrackeh

I still cant grasp the general concept of op amps... Ill keep reading.

cr0sh


I still cant grasp the general concept of op amps... Ill keep reading.



The general concept of an opamp is in its name: Operational Amplifier. Its designed to perform mathematical operations on analog signals; in fact, that was one of its original uses, as a mathematical component for analog computers (which were typically faster and typically smaller than the room/building sized digital behemoths which they competed with from the 1930s-1950s - though less accurate, of course).
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

liudr

KE7GKP,

You are off by like 10,000. A typical op-amp has 10^6 gain at 1Hz but that makes no difference. I would try to understand an op-amp with the two "golden rules" and an inverting amplifier circuit. You do need to know Ohm's law to fully understand the rule. The inverting amplifier amplifies signal by a gain and inverts the signal. The inverting part makes no difference on audio signals though.

pwillard


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